Java Sessions

Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Wednesday, July 25

Will the Next Generation Internet Still Depend on Open Source?
Fred Baker, Cisco Systems
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 9:00am - 9:30am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
IBM
How important is open source to the future of the Internet? The Internet evolved as it did because of open source software and open standards. The spirit of open source is best expressed by the Internet Engineering Task Force, which operates on the basis of "rough consensus and running code." However, today's Internet is not the playground it was a decade ago. While some applications, like Napster and AIM, use the open Internet effectively, the sacrifice of the end-to-end model makes deployment of innovative applications challenging. The introduction of so-called "middle boxes" - firewalls, translators, caches, and application layer gateways - means that the new applications must actively circumvent these, or must gain their cooperation.

In a highly competitive market, with a lot at stake, developing consensus as well as running code can be difficult. Industry consortia and business models may determine how the future of the Internet gets decided - and who makes those decisions. Cisco Fellow Fred Baker will talk about the challenges that will shape the Internet, and whether Open Source will play as big a role as it has in the past.


An Open Source Success Story on Wall Street
W. Phillip Moore, Open Source Advocate
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 9:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
IBM
Morgan Stanley has what is widely recognized as one of the best IT departments in the financial industry, and has built one of the worlds largest integrated and truly "Enterprise-wide" technology platforms for application deployment.

This infrastructure was architected with a combination of Open Source and proprietary software. This presentation will discuss the challenges faced, both technical and political, when deploying OSS on such a large scale and the problems managed as the environment changes and grows.

The discussion covers the contrast between the OSS experience with that of proprietary closed source products in the same environment, the lessons learned from this experience, and how the OSS community can help make OSS a continued success.


OpenNMS: Java, Network Management, and Open Source
Shane O'Donnell, Oculan Corp.
Track: Java
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 10:45am - 11:30am
Location: Harbor Island II in the East Tower

The OpenNMS community has brought to market an initial production-grade release of the OpenNMS software. This web-based network and systems management platform competes with commercial products like HP's OpenView and IBM's Tivoli. This in-depth presentation looks at the OpenNMS project, architecture, and complementary technologies such as PostgreSQL, Apache's Jakarta Tomcat server (Servlets and JSPs), Sun's JSDT, and many technologies within the Apache XML project (Xerces, Xalan, FOP, SOAP, and Crimson).


Building Java Projects with Amber
James Duncan Davidson, http://x180.net/
Track: Java
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 11:30am - 12:15pm
Location: Harbor Island II in the East Tower

The Java platform brings a number of advanced programming tools and concepts to the developer. However collaborative build and development systems still don't take advantage of, and aren't tuned for, Java. Apache Ant, in use by many of the Apache Software Foundation's projects, is the first build tool to replace make (a tool designed for building C based projects) and introduces several key concepts which allows for faster, more efficient building of Java projects. Now a follow-on tool called Amber, designed by the original author of Ant, takes building, packaging, distributing, and managing Java based projects to the next level. This presentation gives an overview of the ways in which Java based projects are different from other types of projects and will explore in depth how Amber can help you build and manage your projects. In the presentation you will see hands on demonstrations of Amber building simple and very complex applications.


OpenEJB: The EJB Container System
David Blevins, OpenEJB
Track: Java
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Location: Harbor Island II in the East Tower

This session covers the OpenEJB container system and the server-container contract. An overview of the container system’s architecture is provided, along with an introduction to the Service Provider APIs. The project's history and community provides context. The container system includes many pluggable parts and defines standard interfaces for adapting transaction services, security services, custom resources, and even new container implementations.


Using JBoss.org: A Java 2 Enterprise Edition-based Container
Andreas Schaefer, JBoss Group LLC
Track: Java
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Location: Harbor Island II in the East Tower

This session covers the fundamentals of JBoss.org's distributed kernel. JBoss is a mature, state-of-the-art, open source Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) based container. Our modular kernel based on Java Management eXtensions (JMX) is used in production around the world.

This session will also focus on the usage of the JMX infrastructure to customize and use JBoss modules of your own. We will study our integration of Apache's Tomcat as an MBean. JBoss enables you to mix and match these components through JMX by replacing any component you wish with a JMX compliant implementation of your choice.

Because of its very high degree of modularity, JBoss server is a prime candidate for embedding in web-enabled, database-driven and scalable applications. JBoss provides JBossServer, the basic EJB container and JMX infrastructure, JBossMQ, for JMS messaging, JBossTX for JTA/JTS transactions, JBossSX for JAAS based security, JBossCX for JCA connectivity and JBossCMP for CMP persistence.


The JAWIN Architecture for Java/COM/Win32 Interop
Stuart Halloway, Relevance LLC
Track: Java
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 3:45pm - 4:30pm
Location: Harbor Island II in the East Tower

This session covers the challenges in bridging component systems. The session includes an in-depth look at how to integrate large numbers of COM and Win32 components into Java systems, and how the JAWIN design tackles those challenges.

The JAWIN project (http://staff.develop.com/halloway/jawinoverview.html) is an open source marshalling layer for Java, Win32, and COM.


Scarab: Issue Tracking System Built for the Ages
Jon S. Stevens, CollabNet
Track: Java
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 4:30pm - 5:15pm
Location: Harbor Island II in the East Tower

This presentation focuses on an explanation of Scarab and the low level Open Source frameworks for Turbine and Velocity which are being developed to support Scarab. Attendees will get a glimpse into the low level aspects of what makes Scarab special: such as Pull based MVC abstraction of user interface and information architecture, as well as, the database abstraction layer.


Thursday, July 26

Shared Source vs. Open Source: Debate and Panel Discussion
Craig Mundie, Microsoft, Michael Tiemann, RedHat, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 8:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
Sun Microsystems
Microsoft Senior Vice President Craig Mundie and Red Hat CTO Michael Tiemann set the stage for a wide-open panel discussion about Microsoft's Shared Source program and the response from the open source community, when they square off in this shared source vs. open source debate.

Mundie set off a far-reaching discussion recently when he introduced Microsoft's Shared Source program, which blends access to source code with the preservation of strong intellectual property rights by software developers, and contrasted Shared Source to Open Source and the GNU General Public License.

There's been a strong response from the open source and free software communities, accusing Microsoft of trying to co-opt the momentum of open source with a program that offers superficial similarities, but few of the real benefits. Microsoft counters that they are trying to find a balance between the needs of commercial developers and the lessons learned from the open source movement.

Mundie will discuss ways in which Shared Source differs from Open Source, and why Microsoft believes that the Shared Source Philosophy supports a strong software business case for commercial software developers and their customers.

Red Hat CTO Michael Tiemann will then discuss the industry's experience with open source vs. pseudo-open licensing, and why he believes that the future will favor stronger (rather than weaker) licenses to protect choice for users and freedom for developers.

His speech will be followed by a panel discussion with Tiemann, Mundie, and other experts on intellectual property and the software industry including,

Tim O'Reilly will moderate the panel.


Friday, July 27

Big Hairy Problems: Open Source Challenges in the Enterprise
Michael Tiemann, RedHat, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 8:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
ActiveState
If you talk to CTOs, their biggest concerns aren’t whether to use commercial software or open source software but a set of large-scale problems that don’t yet have obvious solutions. Oracle may not have solutions for them, but neither does Open Source. Our panel of top CTOs will tell us about enterprise-class problems that they are worried about solving into the future.