Linux Sessions

Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Wednesday, July 25

Will the Next Generation Internet Still Depend on Open Source?
Fred Baker, Cisco Systems
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 9:00am - 9:30am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
IBM
How important is open source to the future of the Internet? The Internet evolved as it did because of open source software and open standards. The spirit of open source is best expressed by the Internet Engineering Task Force, which operates on the basis of "rough consensus and running code." However, today's Internet is not the playground it was a decade ago. While some applications, like Napster and AIM, use the open Internet effectively, the sacrifice of the end-to-end model makes deployment of innovative applications challenging. The introduction of so-called "middle boxes" - firewalls, translators, caches, and application layer gateways - means that the new applications must actively circumvent these, or must gain their cooperation.

In a highly competitive market, with a lot at stake, developing consensus as well as running code can be difficult. Industry consortia and business models may determine how the future of the Internet gets decided - and who makes those decisions. Cisco Fellow Fred Baker will talk about the challenges that will shape the Internet, and whether Open Source will play as big a role as it has in the past.


An Open Source Success Story on Wall Street
W. Phillip Moore, Open Source Advocate
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 9:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
IBM
Morgan Stanley has what is widely recognized as one of the best IT departments in the financial industry, and has built one of the worlds largest integrated and truly "Enterprise-wide" technology platforms for application deployment.

This infrastructure was architected with a combination of Open Source and proprietary software. This presentation will discuss the challenges faced, both technical and political, when deploying OSS on such a large scale and the problems managed as the environment changes and grows.

The discussion covers the contrast between the OSS experience with that of proprietary closed source products in the same environment, the lessons learned from this experience, and how the OSS community can help make OSS a continued success.


Thursday, July 26

Shared Source vs. Open Source: Debate and Panel Discussion
Craig Mundie, Microsoft, Michael Tiemann, RedHat, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 8:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
Sun Microsystems
Microsoft Senior Vice President Craig Mundie and Red Hat CTO Michael Tiemann set the stage for a wide-open panel discussion about Microsoft's Shared Source program and the response from the open source community, when they square off in this shared source vs. open source debate.

Mundie set off a far-reaching discussion recently when he introduced Microsoft's Shared Source program, which blends access to source code with the preservation of strong intellectual property rights by software developers, and contrasted Shared Source to Open Source and the GNU General Public License.

There's been a strong response from the open source and free software communities, accusing Microsoft of trying to co-opt the momentum of open source with a program that offers superficial similarities, but few of the real benefits. Microsoft counters that they are trying to find a balance between the needs of commercial developers and the lessons learned from the open source movement.

Mundie will discuss ways in which Shared Source differs from Open Source, and why Microsoft believes that the Shared Source Philosophy supports a strong software business case for commercial software developers and their customers.

Red Hat CTO Michael Tiemann will then discuss the industry's experience with open source vs. pseudo-open licensing, and why he believes that the future will favor stronger (rather than weaker) licenses to protect choice for users and freedom for developers.

His speech will be followed by a panel discussion with Tiemann, Mundie, and other experts on intellectual property and the software industry including,

Tim O'Reilly will moderate the panel.


Friday, July 27

Big Hairy Problems: Open Source Challenges in the Enterprise
Michael Tiemann, RedHat, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 8:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
ActiveState
If you talk to CTOs, their biggest concerns aren’t whether to use commercial software or open source software but a set of large-scale problems that don’t yet have obvious solutions. Oracle may not have solutions for them, but neither does Open Source. Our panel of top CTOs will tell us about enterprise-class problems that they are worried about solving into the future.


The Great Brain Race
Eric Raymond
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 10:45am - 11:30am
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

Certain trends visible in the open-source world may represent the first waves of a sea change in the way people relate to their jobs and organize to produce goods. This talk will suggest ways in which individual motivation, corporate organization, and the economics of intellectual property are changing as value of human attention rises relative to other factors of production.


RAD Programming on Linux
Ray Lischner, Tempest Software
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 1:45pm - 2:15pm
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

Rapid Application Development (RAD) means different things to different people. Fundamentally, though, everyone agrees that RAD is all about writing end-user applications quickly, cleanly, and effectively. Until recently, RAD tools on Linux were few in number, underpowered, and underutilized. Many attempts at RAD are little more than glorified GUI-builders, but real applications require real code. Borland's Kylix project brings RAD to Linux by combining powerful programming languages (Object Pascal and C++) with visual design tools and an object-oriented component framework. This presentation is aimed at experienced Linux developers introduces RAD, discusses when to apply RAD techniques and when not to, and delves into the specific aspects of RAD: visual tools, component frameworks, extensibility, and OO programming.

Some so-called RAD tools are mere GUI builders. Real applications are much more than a handful of widgets and windows. Some RAD tools advertise the minimal coding needed to write an "application." Real programs need code. The key to effective RAD is to let the tool do the tedious code so the programmer is free to focus on the core logic of the application. RAD tools can use three different techniques to alleviate the coding burden: visual design tools, reusable software components, and powerful OO libraries.

GUI Builders have been around for years, and they continue to be improved. For example, most visual design tools support the visual manipulation of non-visual components. Design-time manipulation of component properties is the mainstay of Visual Basic, Delphi, Java Beans, and more. The best RAD tools, however, go beyond WYSIWYG layout tools and use other visual aids for navigating complex window design, editing menus, working with database interfaces, and more.

Object-oriented techniques offer many opportunities for code reuse. RAD tools span the spectrum from the most basic level of having a large library of useful code, to reusable, object-oriented component frameworks. A RAD framework must be extensible, so you can easily add your own custom components.

At this time, the best RAD tools are commercial, but that is not an impediment to Open Source development. Borland supports Open Source development that uses its commercial tools, and this session examines the license issues.


Thin Clients and GNU/Linux Using LTSP
Jim McQuillan, Linux Terminal Server Project (LTSP)
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 2:15pm - 2:45pm
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

Linux makes a great platform for deploying diskless workstations that boot from a network server. The goal of the Linux Terminal Server Project (www.LTSP.org) is to create the administration tools to deploy and manage diskless workstations (thin clients) in an enterprise setting.

This technology is very important to the success of Linux in the corporate environment.

We have already saved several customers many thousands of dollars and it has earned a 1st place award in the First Annual Linux Solutions contest put on by the Linux Consultants Support and Resource Center, VarBusiness and LinuxToday.com.

My talk 'Thin Clients and GNU/Linux using LTSP' is aimed at beginner and intermediate system administrators. This will give them an introduction to the challenges that await them in deploying thin clients. Whether they are adding an additional workstation at home, 5 workstations at a dental office, 50 workstations in a Cyber-Cafe or 500 workstations in a major university or corporation.


An Introduction to Crystal Space Games Toolkit
Richard D. Shank, Crystal Space
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 2:45pm - 3:00pm
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

Crystal Space is an Open Source and very portable 3D Game Development Kit. This talk goes in depth about two very important systems inside the Crystal Space Framework. SCF is a portable system that enables Crystal Space to have plugin support on all platforms. Using SCF enables Crystal Space developers to make the engine really modular and not have to worry about system details like how to load the dynamic module and so on. In addition SCF allows access to C++ classes without having the C++ name-mangling problem for modules compiled with different compilers. VFS is a file system on top of the real file system that hides the non-portable aspects of file systems and also allows transparent access to ZIP archives as if they were simple directories.


Creating a Development Environment for Embedded Linux
Dr. Richard Sevenich, Eastern Washintgon University, Stuart Steiner, Eastern Washington University
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 3:45pm - 4:30pm
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

A variety of personal digital assistants (PDA's) are available in the marketplace, some with an embedded version of Linux. These small handhelds are remarkably powerful and are blurring the line between the embedded and desktop worlds. The number and variety of potential applications provide significant opportunities for developers.

This talk presents our experience in getting a particular PDA development environment to a reasonably mature state, culminating in a developer's CDROM that automates the creation of that environment. Topics to be covered include:


Embedded Linux Case Study: The Flying Penguin
Christopher Grill, Crown Computers
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 4:30pm - 5:15pm
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

The talk will start with a brief overview of Linux in an embedded environment. This will lead into a description of the Flying Penguin project. The Flying Penguin Project is actually my entry in a contest sponsored by Embedded Linux Journal and Tri-M Systems. The contest is to use the new Machz104 boards from Tri-M for an interesting embedded Linux application.

The Flying Penguin is a radio-controlled airplane that is fitted with the MachZ104 computer, and an Ashtech G8 GPS receiver. This is a work in progress and will be completed around the time of the OS conference. The talk will be given from a problems solved standpoint, specifically problems solved via open source solutions.


FVNC: A Scaling and Faster VNC Viewer for X
Ricardo Ueda Karpischek
Track: Linux
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 11:30pm - 12:15pm
Location: Harbor Island I in the East Tower

Our talk comprises 4 items: