Mozilla Sessions

Wednesday | Thursday | Friday

Wednesday, July 25

Will the Next Generation Internet Still Depend on Open Source?
Fred Baker, Cisco Systems
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 9:00am - 9:30am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
IBM
How important is open source to the future of the Internet? The Internet evolved as it did because of open source software and open standards. The spirit of open source is best expressed by the Internet Engineering Task Force, which operates on the basis of "rough consensus and running code." However, today's Internet is not the playground it was a decade ago. While some applications, like Napster and AIM, use the open Internet effectively, the sacrifice of the end-to-end model makes deployment of innovative applications challenging. The introduction of so-called "middle boxes" - firewalls, translators, caches, and application layer gateways - means that the new applications must actively circumvent these, or must gain their cooperation.

In a highly competitive market, with a lot at stake, developing consensus as well as running code can be difficult. Industry consortia and business models may determine how the future of the Internet gets decided - and who makes those decisions. Cisco Fellow Fred Baker will talk about the challenges that will shape the Internet, and whether Open Source will play as big a role as it has in the past.


An Open Source Success Story on Wall Street
W. Phillip Moore, Open Source Advocate
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 9:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
IBM
Morgan Stanley has what is widely recognized as one of the best IT departments in the financial industry, and has built one of the worlds largest integrated and truly "Enterprise-wide" technology platforms for application deployment.

This infrastructure was architected with a combination of Open Source and proprietary software. This presentation will discuss the challenges faced, both technical and political, when deploying OSS on such a large scale and the problems managed as the environment changes and grows.

The discussion covers the contrast between the OSS experience with that of proprietary closed source products in the same environment, the lessons learned from this experience, and how the OSS community can help make OSS a continued success.


State of the Mozilla Project
Mitchell Baker, Mozilla Corporation
Track: Mozilla
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 10:45am - 11:30am
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

This talk will provide an overview of the status of the Mozilla project, with an emphasis on using Mozilla technologies in other projects. The talk will discuss Mozilla functionality suitable for use in other projects , existing Mozilla-based projects and products, and Mozilla developments for the embedded Linux world. The talk will also describe how mozilla.org interacts with developers and consumers of Mozilla technology. Topics will include Mozilla project management and milestone releases, "Bugzilla" as the answer to almost everything, determination of policy and process, and responses to commercial needs and management practices.

This talk should be of interested to those using of Mozilla technologies , and in interacting with mozilla.org in the management of Mozilla development. No specific technical knowledge is required.


State of the Mozilla Codebase
Brendan Eich, Mozilla Foundation, Rob Ginda
Track: Mozilla
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 11:30am - 12:15pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

This talk will provide an overview of the status of the Mozilla code base. Brendan will cover the general architecture, the Mozilla roadmap, and the new checking & review procedures. After an overview of everyone's favorite topics such as the status of the work on performance, bloat, XBL, DOM, XPCOM, and the like, Brendan will open up the floor for questions from the audience.

This talk should be of interested to those using Mozilla technologies or considering using them. No specific technical knowledge is required, although most of the discussion will be of a technical nature and much of the discussion will assume some knowledge of the current code base.


Embedding Mozilla
Judson Valeski
Track: Mozilla
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

The Mozilla layout engine has been designed to be embedded into other applications. This presentation covers the core concepts involved in embedding Mozilla, as a browser, into your application. Through demonstrative CPP code samples, I will include an overview of Mozilla's embedding related interfaces which your application will call and implement. Mozilla's component system (XPCOM), and the services/capabilities currently provided in our embedding interfaces will also be covered.


Komodo: Building an Application Based on the Mozilla Framework
David Ascher, ActiveState
Track: Mozilla
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

This talk presents a historical overview and architecture of Komodo, ActiveState's cross-platform, multi-language, IDE, written on top of the Mozilla framework. Discuss Mozilla’s offerings and why it may be better than other toolkits. Explore the how and why ActiveState chose to implement Python XPCOM indings and use Python as the primary development language.


Lessons Learned from Working with Mozilla
Mike Shaver, Mozilla Corporation, Richard Alan, David Ascher, ActiveState, Richard Burridge, Sun Microsystems
Track: Mozilla
Date: Wednesday, July 25
Time: 3:45pm - 5:00pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower


Thursday, July 26

Shared Source vs. Open Source: Debate and Panel Discussion
Craig Mundie, Microsoft, Michael Tiemann, RedHat, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 8:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
Sun Microsystems
Microsoft Senior Vice President Craig Mundie and Red Hat CTO Michael Tiemann set the stage for a wide-open panel discussion about Microsoft's Shared Source program and the response from the open source community, when they square off in this shared source vs. open source debate.

Mundie set off a far-reaching discussion recently when he introduced Microsoft's Shared Source program, which blends access to source code with the preservation of strong intellectual property rights by software developers, and contrasted Shared Source to Open Source and the GNU General Public License.

There's been a strong response from the open source and free software communities, accusing Microsoft of trying to co-opt the momentum of open source with a program that offers superficial similarities, but few of the real benefits. Microsoft counters that they are trying to find a balance between the needs of commercial developers and the lessons learned from the open source movement.

Mundie will discuss ways in which Shared Source differs from Open Source, and why Microsoft believes that the Shared Source Philosophy supports a strong software business case for commercial software developers and their customers.

Red Hat CTO Michael Tiemann will then discuss the industry's experience with open source vs. pseudo-open licensing, and why he believes that the future will favor stronger (rather than weaker) licenses to protect choice for users and freedom for developers.

His speech will be followed by a panel discussion with Tiemann, Mundie, and other experts on intellectual property and the software industry including,

Tim O'Reilly will moderate the panel.


Using JavaScript with XPCOM: Components the Easy Way
Michael Ang, Linuxcare
Track: Mozilla
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 10:45am - 11:30am
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

The Cross-Platform Component Object Model (XPCOM) is a framework used in Mozilla that lets you write software components and access them in any XPCOM-compatible programming language (e.g. C++, JavaScript, Python). Components are typically written and used in C++, but the mechanics of doing so can be onerous. JavaScript provides an easier way of using XPCOM that is appropriate in many circumstances.

This talk will cover the basics of XPCOM and show how to use it from JavaScript. We'll look at how to access existing components and the step-by-step process of writing a new component and making it available to XPCOM clients.

By the end of this talk you should have enough information to write a new JavaScript XPCOM component that can be used by any XPCOM client. Specific knowledge of JavaScript programming and XPCOM is not required.

This talk should appeal to anyone who is interested in extending the Mozilla browser or has an interest in XPCOM or other component object models (e.g. COM, CORBA, Bonobo).


Using XPCOM and Python with Mozilla
Mark Hammond, Enfold Systems
Track: Mozilla
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 11:30am - 12:15pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

This tutorial shows how to use the open source (MPL) Python XPCOM bindings from within the Mozilla framework. Starting with a brief overview of the Mozilla XPCOM model, the presenters discusses implementation of XPCOM for Python. The tutorial then demonstrates how Python uses XPCOM components written in any other language and how components are written in Python for use by any other language.


Mozilla Community Quality Assurance and Testing
Asa Dotzler, Mozilla Foundation
Track: Mozilla
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

Mozilla community quality assurance and testing is much more than a traditional beta program. It covers a broad range of activities integral to Mozilla development. The community is made up of both paid and volunteer testers and is probably unique in its size, process, and impact. My talk will outline this novel effort, highlighting the range of activities of this facet of the Mozilla development process. It will give you the necessary information to get directly involved in the Mozilla project, and should also provide helpful information for those interested in starting or expanding Community QA for other open source projects. The talk will familiarize you with relevant tools including Bugzilla, Bonsai, and LXR. The talk will describe how they are used in the primary activities of the community including smoketesting daily builds, reporting bugs, bug triage and the care and feeding of our bug database. It will also explain some easy ways that non-hackers can get directly involved with the project, describing the step-by-step process of several key activities.

By the end of this talk you will have an understanding of the activities Community QA provides to the Mozilla project and might provide for other projects. You will also have the necessary information to become an effective participant in the Mozilla project. using Bugzilla, Bonsai, LXR, newsgroups, email and IRC.

This talk should appeal to anyone who wants to get directly involved in the Mozilla project or understand the Community QA activities. The focus on non-hackers; no specific programming knowledge is required.


Lightning Talks

Track: Mozilla
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 2:30pm - 3:15pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

These 5-minute talks cover a variety of topics related to Perl, Mozilla and Open Source.


Networking in Mozilla
Gagan Saksena, Netscape Communications
Track: Mozilla
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 3:45pm - 4:30pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

This presentation is an overview of the networking architecture in Mozilla. The overview provides information needed to write a protocol handler allowing the loading a URL of your scheme type. You will learn how a URL entered on the location bar turns into a network request, how the data is received, filtered through the stream converters, and piped to the parser and layout.


Jabberzilla and Mozilla Integration
Eric Murphy, Jabber.com
Track: Mozilla
Date: Thursday, July 26
Time: 4:30pm - 5:15pm
Location: Harbor Island III in the East Tower

This presentation will briefly overview the Jabber technology and protocol, the Mozilla architecture, and then shows how they have come together to form the Jabberzilla client in detail. Key points would be coding techniques, skins, and integration with Mozilla.

Code snippets to illustrate important parts of Jabberzilla, and thorough explanations of how it works will inform the audience. Techniques would be pointed out that might help others develop Mozilla applications.

A demo of skins for Jabberzilla shows how a customized Jabber client can be made in a very short period of time.

Finally a demonstration of Jabberzilla's integration with Mozilla shows how Jabber functionality can be integrated into web pages or e-mail. An incomplete article in development (for publication on the Jabberzilla website in a few weeks) can be viewed to preview these concepts here. The website for Jabberzilla is jabberzilla.mozdev.org.


Friday, July 27

Big Hairy Problems: Open Source Challenges in the Enterprise
Michael Tiemann, RedHat, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Friday, July 27
Time: 8:45am - 10:15am
Location: Grande Ballrooms ABC in the East Tower

Sponsored by
ActiveState
If you talk to CTOs, their biggest concerns aren’t whether to use commercial software or open source software but a set of large-scale problems that don’t yet have obvious solutions. Oracle may not have solutions for them, but neither does Open Source. Our panel of top CTOs will tell us about enterprise-class problems that they are worried about solving into the future.