O'Reilly Open Source Convention
Books Safari Bookshelf Conferences O'Reilly Network
   


Arrow Home
Arrow Registration
Arrow Speakers
Arrow Keynotes
Arrow Tutorials
Arrow Sessions
Arrow At-a-Glance
Arrow Wiki
Arrow BOFs
Arrow Events
Arrow Exhibitors
Arrow Sponsors
Arrow Hotel/Travel
Arrow Venue Map
Arrow See & Do
Arrow Tips for
 Attending
Arrow Press
Arrow Mail List

OSCON.

Tutorial

SOLD OUT How to Play Together Nicely: Strategies for DBAs and Application Developers
Greg Sabino Mullane

Track: PostgreSQL
Date: Tuesday, July 27
Time: 1:45pm - 5:15pm
Location: Columbia

TrackBackTrackBack

The name of the database should not be the only thing in common between database administrators and application developers. Learn how both can benefit by using some simple practices and guidelines, and by taking advantage of database features such as views, rules, triggers, and functions, specifically:

  • Introduction
  • Historical roles: Who does what?
  • The problems with writing applications against a database.
  • The solutions (with examples)
  • Who owns the data? Keeping everything close together
  • Who drives the project? Power distribution
  • Designing databases, schemas, and applications
  • Documentation, APIs, and mutual distrust
  • Users, roles, and permissions
  • Some developers are more equal than others
  • DML, DDL, and functions.
  • Other players: QA, UI, management, marketing, sysadmins
  • Overview of DBA tools. Who else should use them?
  • Schemas and the power of plain text
  • Centralizing information with revision control
  • Working together and learning other languages
  • Configuration considerations
  • Who does the work? Application vs. the database
  • String parsing, dates, and common languages* Configuration considerations
  • Who does the work? Application vs. the database
  • String parsing, dates, and common languages
  • Controlling access to the data (SELECT)
  • Functions: the linchpin of it all
  • Views: normalization, security, ease of use, intuitive
  • Rules and triggers: putting it all together
  • Constraints, domains, and comments.
  • Physical considerations: backups, large objects, and partitioning.
  • Moving forward
  • Advanced database topics


  • O'Reilly Home | Privacy Policy

    © 2004, O'Reilly Media, Inc.