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Omniture
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Fast Company
Federated Media
Information Week
Online Publishers Association
Red Herring
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Arthur Sulzberger, Jr.
Arthur Sulzberger, Jr. was named chairman of The New York Times Company on October 16, 1997. As the Company’s senior executive, he is responsible for its long-term business strategy. Sulzberger, who became publisher of The New York Times in 1992, continues to run the Company’s flagship enterprise on a day-to-day basis. Over the past decade, he has shaped and implemented innovative print, broadcast, and online initiatives that are enabling the Company to compete successfully in the 21st century global media marketplace. These include: • Transforming The Times into a national newspaper • Developing a major Times company presence on the Internet, which now includes NYTimes.com, the No.1 newspaper-owned web site in the world, Boston.com, About.com, and IHT.com • Acquiring the International Herald Tribune. • Becoming a minority partner in New England Sports Ventures, which includes the Boston Red Sox, Fenway Park, and 80% of the New England Sports Network.

During Sulzberger’s tenure as publisher, The Times has earned 31 Pulitzer Prizes and provided its readers with innumerable examples of momentous journalism such as its breakthrough series “How Race is Lived in America,” its internationally acclaimed coverage of the September 11 terrorist attack in a “A Nation Challenged” and “Portraits of Grief,” “Class Matters,” a 11-part series exploring class in American society, “Bush Lets U.S. Spy on Callers Without Courts,” an expose of the Bush Administration’s use of wiretaps and “China Rises,” a four-part, multimedia series.

It should also be noted that The New York Times Company has been repeatedly cited for its commitment to excellence, innovation, and social responsibility.

Before coming to The Times, Sulzberger was a reporter with The Raleigh (N.C.) Times from 1974 to 1976, and a London correspondent for The Associated Press from 1976 to 1978.

He joined The Times in 1978 as a correspondent in its Washington bureau and moved to New York as a metro reporter in 1981 and was appointed assistant metro editor later that year.

From 1983 to 1987, he worked in a variety of business departments, including production and corporate planning. In January 1987, he was named assistant publisher and, a year later, deputy publisher, overseeing the news and business departments. In both capacities, he was involved in planning The Times's automated color printing and distribution facilities in Edison, N.J., and at College Point in Queens, N.Y., as well as the creation of the six-section color newspaper.

Sulzberger played a central role in the development of the Times Square Business Improvement District, officially launched in January 1992, serving as the first chairman of that civic organization. He also helped found and serves as chairman of the New York City Outward Bound Center.

Sulzberger earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science from Tufts University in 1974. He is also a 1985 graduate of the Harvard Business School's Program for Management Development.

  Arthur Sulzberger, Jr.