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Speakers

O'Reilly & Associates specializes in capturing the knowledge of emerging innovators and delivering that knowledge and the innovators, themselves, to our attendees at the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference.

Our speakers are literaly in the process of inventing the Internet Operating System. In line with our emphasis on technology, our speakers refrain from marketing-oriented hyperbole. They focus on a vision for the future of the Internet, the important challenges that lie ahead, and present the emerging wisdom from their work. They will give you immediately useful knowledge - skills you can take back to improve the way you think about, plan and deploy your Internet initiatives.


Mohamed Abdelaziz
Mohamed Abdelaziz is one of the principal senior architects of Project JXTA, Peer-to-Peer Networking, at Sun Microsystems since the inception of the project. Most of Mohamed's focus has been in the areas of DHT, Discovery, Peer Resolution, Pipe, and net.jxta.socket to name a few. Mohamed's professional life before Project JXTA included research and development of Java Technologies, Data Communication, and device driver development.

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Joe Addiego
Joe Addiego is portfolio manager for In-Q-Tel and responsible for working with In-Q-Tel's portfolio companies to develop fast-growing market leaders. Addiego began his technology career working for a number of Fortune 500 technology companies, including Hewlett-Packard and AT&T. He has successfully grown companies from early-stage, privately funded ventures into thriving, publicly traded organizations, such as Talarian and Wind River Systems.

In-Q-Tel, Inc. is a private, venture capital firm chartered by the CIA. In-Q-Tel strives to extend the Agency's access to new IT companies, solutions, and approaches to address their priority problems. In-Q-Tel invests in technologies that addresses critical CIA needs, and that can also become commercially viable.

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David Anderson
Dr. David P. Anderson is director of SETI@home at U.C. Berkeley. Before that he worked at a series of startups (Sonic Solutions, Tunes.com, and United Devices). From 1985 to 1991 was on the faculty of the UCB Computer Science Department. Besides distributed computing, his interests include distance learning, collaborative filtering, the music of Kaikhosru Sorabji, and bouldering.

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George Arriola
George is the product manager for Adobe GoLive. Working in his role within the cross-media division at Adobe he is responsible for driving feature design, through new product and technology releases. George has over 9 years of design and technical expertise relating to Wireless, Graphic and Experience design disciplines.

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Matthew Asham
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Nick Bobic
Nick Bobic is a researcher at University of Ottawa focusing primarily in experimental algorithms, neuroscience, evolutionary algorithms, cryptography, bio systems, wireless computing, and P2P technology. Bobic is the primary developer of Cryptobox which is a secure decentralized application platform. Cryptobox was the first P2P system to use bio principles. More recently, Bobic is working on a new self-sustaining bio system application for the financial sector along with three researchers from Japan.

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Eric Bonabeau, Ph.D.
Eric Bonabeau is the founder and chief scientist of Icosystem Corporation, a Boston-based “idea incubator” that uses computational evolution to invent novel business models, design new products and create new strategies. Before Icosystem he was the CEO of Eurobios and has been a research director for France Telecom R&D, an R&D engineer at Cadence Design Systems, and the Interval Research Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute. He is the author of three books, over one hundred science articles, and is co-editor-in-chief of Advances in Complex Systems and of ACM Transactions in Adaptive Autonomous Systems. A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique and of Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications in Paris, he earned a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Paris at Orsay.

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Adam Bosworth
Adam Bosworth joined Google recently as Vice President of Engineering. Bosworth comes to Google from BEA where he was Chief Architect & Senior VP of Advanced Development and responsible for driving the engineering efforts for BEA's Framework Division. Prior to joining BEA, Bosworth co-founded Crossgain, a software development firm recently acquired by BEA. Known as one of the pioneers of XML, Bosworth held various senior management positions at Microsoft, including General Manager of the WebData group, a team focused on defining and driving XML strategy.

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Don Box
Don Box is an architect at Microsoft where he works on XML messaging technologies and protocols. Don began the XML phase of his life by co-authoring the first SOAP specification in 1998 and has been active in the field of hooking programs together for at least a dozen years.

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Michel Burger
Michel Burger is the CTO of Embrace Networks, a provider of a platform to project devices to Web services and is an expert in defining innovative architectures for User-to-User Collaboration and pervasive systems. Michel previously worked in Sapient's Thought Leadership group on Web service architecture and P2P technologies.

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Mike Chambers
Mike Chambers has spent the last eight years building applications that target the Flash runtime. During that time, he has worked with numerous technologies including Flash, Generator, .NET, Central, Flex, and Ajax. He is currently the Principal Product Manager for developer relations for Adobe AIR. He has written and spoken extensively on Flash and Rich Internet Application development and is coauthor of the Apollo for Adobe Flex Developers Pocket Guide, Adobe Integrated Runtime (AIR) for JavaScript Developers Pocketguide, Flash Enabled: Flash Design and Development for Devices as well as Generator and Flash Demystified. Mike received his Masters in International Economics and European Studies from the John Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) in 1998.

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Justin F. Chapweske
Justin Chapweske is the Founder and CEO of Onion Networks, Inc., a company based in Minneapolis, Minnesota that provides file transfer acceleration and network infrastructure software for enterprise applications. Justin is the original inventor of Swarmcast, the first ever "swarming" content delivery network and more recently has unveiled "swarmstreaming", a new swarming technology that allows smooth progressive playback of video and skipping ahead without downloading the entire file.

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Ekaterina Chtcherbina
Ekaterina Chtcherbina is a Software Scientist at Siemens AG, Germany where she researches new technologies in the area of mobile applications and flexible service networking. Ekaterina's current focus is applying peer-to-peer technology and Web services in the ad-hoc mobile environment.

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Geoff Cohen
Geoff Cohen, Ph.D. is a consultant and writer on the future of software. He is a member of the Program Committee of Onward!: Seeking New Paradigms and New Thinking. His research interests include biological models of computing, new software development methodologies, and social software.

He has worked for the Cap Gemini Ernst & Young Center for Business Innovation, IBM, Data General, and the Congressional Budget Office. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University and a B.A. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

His website is www.coherenceengine.com

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James Duncan Davidson
James Duncan Davidson is a freelance author, software developer, and consultant focusing on Mac OS X and related technologies. He is the author of Running Mac OS X Panther, the coauthor of Mac OS X Panther Hacks (with Rael Dornfest) , the coauthor of Learning Cocoa with Objective-C (with Apple Computer, Inc.), and the coauthor of Cocoa in a Nutshell (with Michael Beam), all published by OReilly Media, as well as publisher of his own web site, x180

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Roger Dingledine
Roger Dingledine is a security and privacy researcher. While at MIT, he developed Free Haven, one of the early peer-to-peer systems that emphasized resource management while retaining anonymity for its users. He consults for government and industry to design and develop systems for anonymity and traffic analysis resistance. Recent work includes anonymous publishing and communication systems, traffic analysis resistance, censorship resistance, attack resistance for decentralized networks, and reputation.

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Chris Dix
Chris Dix is Lead Developer for NavTraK where he is building the next generation of location systems. He is also an author and developer specializing in Web Services. Dix is back by popular demand after speaking at the O'Reilly P2P and Web Services Conference.

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Cory Doctorow
Cory Doctorow (craphound.com) is a science fiction novelist, blogger and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing (boingboing.net), and a contributor to Wired, Popular Science, Make, the New York Times, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (eff.org), a non-profit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards and treaties. Presently, he serves as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

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Rael Dornfest
Rael Dornfest is Founder and CEO of Portland, Oregon-based Values of n. Rael leads the Values of n charge with passion, unearthly creativity, and a repertoire of puns and jokes — some of which are actually good. Prior to founding Values of n, he was O'Reilly's Chief Technical Officer, program chair for the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, series editor of the bestselling Hacks book series, and instigator of O'Reilly's Rough Cuts early access program. He built Meerkat, the first web-based feed aggregator, was champion and co-author of the RSS 1.0 specification, and has written and contributed to six O'Reilly books. Rael's programmatic pride and joy is the nimble, open source blogging application Blosxom, the principles of which you'll find in the Values of n philosophy and embodied in Stikkit: Little yellow notes that think.

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William K. Downey
William K. ďBillĒ Downey was involved with the automotive division of American Honda Inc. for over 12 years before joining Interface Dynamics Inc. in July, 2001 as Director of Sales and Marketing. He brought the company his knowledge of research and development, product marketing , sales and customer service.

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Mike Duigou
Mike Duigou is working on open source software at Sun Microsystems, Inc. and is most involved with the network transport and messaging layers of Project JXTA and the JXTA Protocol Specification effort. He has been involved with the advertisements and documents, the authentication model and the IDs. He is currently working on the JXTA-C implementation project. Mike's first open source contributions were to the Citadel BBS software in 1987. He has been using the handle 'Bondolo' since he first joined the net community in 1984.

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Rob Flickenger
Rob Flickenger has been writing professionally since 2002. He has written and edited several books, including “Building Wireless Community Networks” and “Wireless Hacks”, published by O’Reilly Media. In 2006 he founded Hacker Friendly LLC, an independent publishing company that uses wiki software and print-on-demand technology to produce books. In its first year, Hacker Friendly produced "How To Accelerate Your Internet" bwmo.net and "Wireless Networking in the Developing World" wndw.net, which have been widely distributed in Africa and South America.

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Richard Forno
Richard Forno is a recognized security professional, author, lecturer, and teacher, and is currently the CTO for a Dulles, Virginia firm providing full-spectrum information assurance support to the national security and intelligence community. In this role Forno assists in corporate strategy, product development, industry outreach, and policy analysis, among other projects.

Forno is a frequent lecturer at government, industry, and academic symposia, and co-author of the popular The Art of Information Warfare (Universal, 1999) and Incident Response Planning and Coordination (O'Reilly, 2001). His 1998 essay on the "InfoCorps" helped shape DoD initiatives in developing information assurance and Internet risk assessment capabilities during the 1990s. He also pens a recurring column for Securityfocus.Com and his personal website, Infowarrior.Org.

Richard holds degrees from Valley Forge Military College, The American University School of International Service, and is the youngest recorded graduate from the United States Naval War College. He will complete his masters degree in international relations in May 2002.

Forno's professional affiliations include the National Military Intelligence Association (Past President of the Potomac Chapter); OPSEC Professionals Society (Past Director and Journal Editor); High-Technology Crime Investigations Association; and United States Naval War College Foundation

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Steve Gillmor
Steve Gillmor is a ZDNet contributing editor, a Release 1.0 contributing writer, and host of the weekly web radio program The Gillmor Gang. He is also the president of the non-profit Attention Trust.

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Lucas Gonze
Lucas Gonze is Cofounder and CEO of WorldOS Corp., a decentralized infrastructure provider. Prior to WorldOS he ran a web consulting shop. His work includes a server for coordinating web based multiplayer games, an encrypting proxy, a multiplexing socket proxy, a real time SQL gateway, two web banks, two web bookstores, and numerous other e-commerce sites. He is a regular commentator on P2P and founded the [decentralization] list.

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Hugh Grant
Hugh Grant is co-founder and CTO of Cape Clear Software. Previously, Grant was Chief Architect at IONA Technologies, where he oversaw the technical direction of all product lines. Over the past 14 years Grant has worked as a Principal Engineer for Oracle Corporation, Fujitsu/ICL, and Glockenspiel in the USA, UK, Germany, Japan, and Ireland. Grant holds a bachelor's degree in Mathematics from Trinity College Dublin and a master's degree in Computation from Oxford University.

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Adam Gross
Adam Gross is a vice president of developer marketing at salesforce.com, where he focuses on helping businesses and ISVs create new on-demand applications for the company's AppExchange platform and directory.

Before salesforce.com, Gross led product marketing for Grand Central, where he helped create one of the first companies in the Web Services space. He also co-founded Personify, a San Francisco-based CRM software company that focused on analytics and personalization, and served as a technology analyst in Stanford Research Institute's Media Futures Program.

Gross holds a B.S. in new media systems and policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Robin Gross
Robin Gross is an intellectual property attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a leading cyber-liberties organization where she is engaged in public interest litigation. Gross specializes in intellectual property policy and digital music legal issues and serves as Director of EFF's Campaign for Audiovisual Free Expression (CAF…), which she launched in June of 1999 to explore the interaction of intellectual property and freedom of expression in a digital world.

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JC Herz
JC Herz is the project leader of CASCADE, a Defense Department initiative to identify emerging technologies, modify as needed, and shepherd them through the Defense Department's Kafka-esque bureaucracy so that they can be used by operators in the field. Focus areas are social software and computer games. Current clients include Special Forces Command, the Undersecretary of Defense (Intelligence), and DARPA.

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Steven Hofmeyr, Ph.D.
Steven Hofmeyr is CTO of Company 51, which he recently founded for the purpose of bringing his research into the real world. Hofmeyr has long been fascinated by what biology can teach us about system design. His interests have taken him from researching the dynamics of genetic algorithms, to delving into the intricacies of immunology.

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Meg Hourihan
Meg Hourihan is a writer and technologist with more than eight years of experience in Web design and application development. Hourihan is also a highly regarded expert on all things weblog -- from their social implications to the development of advanced blogging systems. Her work as the co-founder and director of development at Pyra Labs led to the creation of Blogger, the popular weblogging tool that fueled the current blogging explosion. Hourihan is a regular speaker at technology conferences and she is the co-author of, "We Blog: Publishing Online with Weblogs." She is also a monthly columnist for the O'Reilly Network. Hourihan recently moved to New York City to direct a new media project. You can keep up with her at www.megnut.com.

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Brian Jepson
Brian Jepson is an O'Reilly editor, programmer, and co-author of Mac OS X Panther for Unix Geeks and Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther. He's also a volunteer system administrator and all-around geek for AS220, a non-profit arts center in Providence, Rhode Island. AS220 gives Rhode Island artists uncensored and unjuried forums for their work. These forums include galleries, performance space, and publications. Brian sees to it that technology, especially free software, supports that mission.

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Steven Johnson
Steven Johnson is the author of five books, including the national bestsellers The Ghost Map, Everything Bad Is Good For You, and Mind Wide Open. His latest online project, the neighborhood mapping site outside.in, launched in October of 2006. Previously, he was the co-creator of the pioneering online magazine FEED and the Webby-award-winning community site, Plastic.com. He is a Distinguished Writer In Residence at NYU's Department of Journalism, and blogs at stevenberlinjohnson.com.

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Brewster Kahle
Since the mid-1980s, Brewster has focused on developing transformational technologies for information discovery and digital libraries. In 1989 Brewster invented the Internet’s first publishing system, WAIS (Wide Area Information Server) system and in 1989, founded WAIS Inc., a pioneering electronic publishing company that was sold to America Online in 1995. In 1996, Brewster founded Internet Archive, the largest publicly accessible, privately funded digital archive in the world. At the same time, he co-founded Alexa Internet in April 1996, which was sold to Amazon.com in 1999. Alexa's services are bundled into more than 80% of Web browsers.

Brewster earned a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1982. As a student, he studied artificial intelligence with Marvin Minsky and W. Daniel Hillis. In 1983, Brewster helped start Thinking Machines, a parallel supercomputer maker, serving there as lead engineer for six years. He is profiled in Digerati: Encounters with the Cyber Elite (HardWired, 1996). He was selected as a member of the Upside 100 in 1997, Micro Times 100 in 1996 and 1997, and Computer Week 100 in 1995.

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Rohit Khare
Rohit Khare is the Director of CommerceNet Labs, which is investigating decentralized electronic commerce. Dr. Rohit Khare is an award-winning researcher in the fields of Internet protocols and decentralized systems. He founded KnowNow in 2000 and previously worked on Internet standards development at MCI's Internet Architecture Group and the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). He founded 4K Associates and edited the World Wide Web Journal (W3J) for O'Reilly & Associates. He received his Ph.D. in Software Engineering from U.C. Irvine in 2003.

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John Ko
John Ko founded Cincro in 1996 looking for convergence between supercomputing, visualization, and real-time data collaboration. Over the past five years, Ko has designed and helped to develop this convergence, called Zanvas (Zoomable Canvas). Ko began his career in 1984 working on CRAY supercomputers and SGI workstations. He has a B.S. from Northwestern University.

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Lawrence Lessig
Lawrence Lessig is a Professor of Law and John A. Wilson Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Stanford Law School. Professor Lessig is chairman of the board of Creative Commons and founder of the school's Center for Internet and Society. He sits on the board of directors for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the Public Library of Science. In 2002, Lessig was named one of Scientific American's Top 50 Innovators, and the American Bar Association recently awarded him the Cyberspace Law Excellence Award.

From 1991 to 1997, Lessig was a professor at the University of Chicago Law School. He then became the Berkman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. In 1999-2000, he was a fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin before moving to Stanford in 2000.

Lessig teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law, law and high technology, Internet regulation, comparative constitutional law, and the law of cyberspace. His book, Code, and Other Laws of Cyberspace, was published by Basic Books, and The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in a Connected World, is available from Random House. His most recent book, Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity, is now available online at www.free-culture.cc and from Penguin Press.

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Carl Malamud
Carl Malamud is the CTO at the Center for American Progress, a Washington, D.C. think tank. Prior to that, he ran the Internet Multicasting Service, which started the first radio station on the Internet and liberated the SEC EDGAR and US Patent databases for free access on the net. The author of 8 books, Carl is also chair of the Jabber Software Foundation.

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Michael Masnick
Michael Masnick is President of Techdirt and discusses technology and business news in a useful format for high tech executives.

Masnick works with executives in fields such as wireless, voice recognition and CRM to keep them ahead in their competitive environment. Masnick has written for publications such as Salon.com and been interviewed on ABCNews.com and TechTV.

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Brian McConnell
Brian McConnell is an inventor, author and serial entrepreneur. He has founded a series of telecom startups, including PhoneZone, one of the first electronic commerce companies; TrekMail, a multimodal messaging company (recently acquired by mobile email service provider Visto; and Open Communication Systems, which has developed a breakthrough conferencing services that will be demoed at ETel. He is also an O'Reilly author and frequent contributor to the O'Reilly Network, and also maintains Telephony Design, a telecom tutorial and buyers guide.

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Jim McCoy
Jim McCoy is the co-founder of Hivecache, the developer of a distributed online backup service and data storage system for the enterprise that pools unused storage resources on the edge of the network into a secure, reliable mesh network of online backup peers. Jim is the principal designer and architect of the MojoNation data storage and distribution system which is at the core of Hivecache. MojoNation was a prototype ad-hoc storage network that used secure communications, distributed resource accounting, and flexible reputation management systems to organize a fault-tolerant network of decentralized data storage nodes. In addition to his work on MojoNation, Jim has written and presented talks on network/application security and on the design and operations of large-scale internet services.

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Mark Miller
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Nelson Minar
Nelson Minar is a software engineer at Google who works on the Google Web APIs and on AdWords. Prior to joining Google in 2001, he was the co-founder of Popular Power, a distributed computing company; a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab; and a research programmer at the Santa Fe Institute. Minar has spoken at several previous O'Reilly conferences and keeps a weblog.

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Dr. Robert Morris
As of July 2004, Dr. Robert Morris is Vice President, Assets Innovation. In this position his mission is to drive innovation for IBM Global Services, about half of the IBM company. This involves four main activities: the creation and commercialization of intellectual assets (typically technology) that can be used to improve service effectiveness; the creation and management of services methods and tools; knowledge management tools; and talent (professions, communities, etc).

Prior to July 2004, Morris was the director of the IBM Almaden Research Center where he oversaw scientists and engineers doing exploratory and applied research in hardware and software areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, storage systems, data management, web technologies and user interfaces. Morris was also vice president for personal systems and storage research, managing this worldwide research work within IBM. During this period he managed the creation of variety of new initiatives, including a joint research institute with Stanford on spintronics, a startup business on webscale knowledge mining and discovery (WebFountain), new technologies for distributed storage and client management, and a focused "services science" research effort. Previously, Morris was a director at the IBM T.J. Watson Research lab in New York, where he led teams in personal systems research and was the executive responsible for the Deep Blue chess machine. He began his employment with IBM at Almaden working on storage and data management technologies. Originally from Australia, he began his career at Bell Laboratories where he was involved in developing a number of communications and computing technologies.

Morris was named chairman of the Bay Area Science Infrastructure Consortium in 2002, an organization consisting of the heads of major research institutions in Silicon Valley and the San Francisco Bay Area. He has published more than fifty articles in computer science, electrical engineering, and mathematics literature and has received eleven patents. He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of California at Los Angeles and is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology and a Fellow of the IEEE. He was an Editor of the IEEE Transactions on Computers from 1986-1991 and is on a variety of advisory boards for leading universities.

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Peter G. Neumann
Peter G. Neumann is Principal Scientist in the SRI Computer Science Lab. Neumann spent eight years at Harvard (1950-58) with an A.B. in Math in 1954, S.M. in Applied Math in 1955, and PhD in 1961 after returning from a two-year Fulbright in Germany (1958-60), where Neumann received the German Dr rerum naturarum in 1960.

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Tom Ngo
Tom Ngo, CTO of NextPage, has 15 years of varied experience with technological innovation. Prior to joining NextPage, Ngo led the set-top box applications group, a flagship effort at Paul Allenís Interval Research Corporation. Among his inventions are a physically compact device to implement the famous cocktail-party effect.

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Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly is founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. In addition to publishing pioneering books like Ed Krol's The Whole Internet User's Guide & Catalog (selected by the New York Public Library as one of the most significant books of the twentieth century), O'Reilly has also been a pioneer in the popularization of the Internet. O'Reilly's Global Network Navigator site (GNN, which was sold to America Online in September 1995) was the first Web portal and the first true commercial site on the World Wide Web.

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Joseph Paradiso
Joseph Paradiso directs the MIT Media Lab's Responsive Environments Group, which explores the development and application of new sensor technologies for human-computer interfaces and intelligent spaces that create new forms of interactive experience and expression.

Over the course of his career, Paradiso has held positions at the MIT Lab for Nuclear Science, CERN Geneva, ETH Zurich, and the Draper Laboratory, where his work has encompassed high-energy physics detectors, spacecraft control systems, electronic sensors, and electronic music instruments.

Paradiso has a Ph.D. in physics from MIT where he was a Compton Fellow and is the winner of a 2000 Discover Magazine Award for Technical Innovation. Visit Joseph's website for background information and links to his projects

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Rima Patel
Rima Patel is a Technology Evangelist at Sun Microsystems and is presently in the Boston area. Patel loves evangelizing technologies involved with all forms of distributed computing. She reaches the developers around the world and talks technology with them through Sun Technology Days and various other recognized events in the industry.

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Matt Peterson
Matt Peterson is the founder of the Bay Area Wireless User Group. BAWUG began as outgrowth of Peterson's work on PlayaNET, an instant wireless intranet for the weeklong desert art expression event known as Burning Man. The organization provides an informational clearinghouse of wireless knowledge (not only limited to 802.11b), monthly meetings, & features a very active 1200+ subscriber mailing list. Matt has been instrumental on initial wireless security research, with recent work focused on WiLDing (Wireless LAN Discovery; NOT "war driving"). Mr. Peterson has been involved in ISP and co-location activities since a very early age in his life. He's been known to convert Linux users to FreeBSD.

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Tim Pozar
Tim Pozar is a communications consulting engineer specializing in commercial microwave path engineering. Pozar is a co-founder of the Bay Area Wireless User Group. He has also dabbled in the Internet startup area, by co-founding a number of companies that are still around on their own or have been assimilated by other companies. Previous to this, for 25 years, he was a radio broadcast engineer.

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Richard F. Rashid, Ph.D.
Currently charged with oversight of Microsoft Research’s worldwide operations, Richard F. Rashid previously served as the director of Microsoft Research, focusing on operating systems, networking and multiprocessors. In that role he was responsible for managing work on key technologies leading to the development of Microsoft Corp’s interactive TV system and authored a number of patents in areas such as data compression, networking and operating systems. In addition to running Microsoft Research, Rashid also was instrumental in creating the team that eventually became Microsoft’s Digital Media Division and directing Microsoft’s first e-commerce group. Rashid was promoted to vice president of Microsoft Research in 1994, and then to senior vice president in 2000.

Before joining Microsoft in September 1991, Rashid was professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). After becoming a CMU faculty member in September 1979, he directed the design and implementation of several influential network operating systems, and published dozens of papers about computer vision, operating systems, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols and communications security. During his tenure at CMU, Rashid developed the Mach multiprocessor operating system, which has been influential in the design of many modern operating systems and remains at the core of a number of commercial systems.

Rashid was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2003 for his work in operating systems and for innovation in industrial research.

He also is credited with co-development of one of the earliest networked computer games, "Alto Trek," during the mid-1970s. An updated version of this game has been developed by Microsoft and has been released under the name "Allegiance."

Rashid is a member of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Computer Directorate Advisory Committee. He is a past member of the DARPA UNIX Steering Committee and the CSNet Executive Committee and a former chairman of the ACM Software System Awards Committee.

Rashid’s research interests have focused on artificial intelligence, operating systems, networking and multiprocessors. He has participated in the design and implementation of the University of Rochester RIG operating system (1975&1979), the Rochester Virtual Terminal Management System (1976&1979), the CMU Distributed Sensor Network Testbed (1980&1983) and CMU’s SPICE distributed personal computing environment, which included the Accent network operating system (1981&1985). He has published papers on computer vision, operating systems, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols and communication security.

Rashid received a Master of Science (1977) and Doctoral (1980) degrees in computer science from the University of Rochester. He graduated with honors in mathematics and comparative literature from Stanford University in 1974.

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Dr. David P. Reed
Dr. David P. Reed's work focuses on the transforming impact of digital technology on the design of technological, business, and social systems. His current explorations center on exploiting new information technologies that enable people to be more effective, including densely scalable mobile networking, mobile computing, group information sharing, video media processing, and infrastructures for electronic commerce.

He brings together research-level knowledge and experience of computer science, software, protocol and data architecture, system modeling, electronics, and signal processing along with commercial experience in R&D management, economics, and technology-based strategy.

In addition to his independent research activities, Dr. Reed is affiliated with the M.I.T. Media Lab, is a DiamondCluster Fellow, and is a member of the Vanguard advisory board. He continues to serve as an independent strategy/technology advisor to a variety of companies, including service on the technical advisory board of several startup ventures. He was previously a vice president and chief scientist at both Lotus Development Corporation and Software Arts, Inc. His career has also included research leadership at Interval Research Corporation, and earlier as a professor at M.I.T.

Dr. Reed received the B.S. ('73), S.M. ('75), E.E. ('76) and Ph.D. ('78) degrees from M.I.T. While a student and professor, he was involved in the original architecture and design of the Internet protocols (TCP,UDP,IP) and is the co-creator of the so-called "end-to-end argument" which is one of the key design principles of the Internet architecture. He also pioneered in coordination and resilience in scalable distributed computing architectures. He is a member of ACM, IEEE, Sigma Xi, and AAAS.

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Scott Regan
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Lisa Rein
Lisa Rein is co-founder of Creative Commons, an XML geek, Internet Archive volunteer, teacher, freelance journalist, videographer, media researcher and graduate student of San Francisco State University, Broadcast Electronic Communication Arts.

Rein teaches XML for UC Berkeley Extension Online, runs her own XML educational website called finetuning.com, and is editor of the XML.com Resource Guide.

Lisa has a video weblog, on lisa reins radar, a music website called lisa rein, and a ton of movies stored on the Internet Archive.

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Bill Robbins
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Sam Ruby
Sam Ruby is a senior technical staff member in the Emerging Technologies group at IBM and is involved in a host of open source initiatives. He is a member of the board of directors and vice president of the Apache Software Foundation and a developer on the Apache Soap project. He is also the chairman of the Jakarta project.

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Terry Schmidt
Terry Schmidt is a Contract Network Consultant, founder of NYCwireless, and a key activist in the international free 802.11 movement. Schmidt is responsible for the first free public 802.11 access point in New York City, the starting point for the not-for-profit organization NYCwireless. NYCwireless with over 350 members, seeks to bring free public wireless access to metropolitan New York City and surrounding areas. Schmidt consults with other free wireless community groups around the world in this rapidly evolving industry segment.

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Greg Schmitzer
Greg Schmitzer is the co-founder and CEO of Jibe Inc., a leading provider of Enterprise Peer-to-Peer solutions. Jibe's P2P Content Networks enable companies to search, share, and deliver distributed files and data.

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Bruce Schneier
Bruce Schneier is the Chief Technology Officer of Counterpane Internet Security, Inc., the world leader in Managed Security Monitoring. Counterpane provides security monitoring services to Fortune 2000 companies world-wide. He is the author of six books on security and cryptography, including the security best seller, "Secrets & Lies: Digital Security in a Networked World." His first book, "Applied Cryptography," has sold over 150,000 copies and is the definitive work in the field. Schneier designed the Blowfish and Twofish encryption algorithms, and writes the influential "Crypto-Gram" monthly newsletter. He is a frequent lecturer on computer security and cryptography.

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John Scott
John Scott (employed at RadiantBlue Technologies) is the project leader of DOD’s Open Technology Development Initiative, which lays the groundwork for streamlined adoption of open source methodologies with DOD, which includes both the adoption (including testing) of private sector open source code and the formation of internal communities of interest around DOD systems, including classified systems. He has held senior positions in technology companies, including three start-ups, including management of software development teams and rapid ramp-up of consulting practices. John holds an MS in Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech and a BA in Mechanical Engineering from Lehigh University. He has been a repeat speaker at the O’Reilly Emerging Technology Conference (and served on the conference committee of its predecessor, Peer-to-Peer), and is a featured speaker at this year’s O’Reilly Open Source Conference.

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Molly Shaffer Van Houweling
Molly Shaffer Van Houweling is the Executive Director of Creative Commons and a Fellow at Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. A 1998 graduate of Harvard Law School, Molly has served as a law clerk to Judge Michael Boudin and Justice David H. Souter, as a staff member of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, and as a Fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School.

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Adam Shand
Adam Shand founded the Personal Telco Project back in November 2000. During that time he has been helping build the infrastructure to support a community maintained, metropolitan area wireless network in Portland Oregon. Since it's inception Personal Telco has grown to more than 400 people with over 30 active nodes and has the beginnings of a "wireless cloud". Many others have helped and to them he is eternally grateful.

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Clay Shirky
Clay Shirky teaches at NYU's graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program. He writes and consults on the social and economic effects of the Internet, concentrating particularly on the decentralization of applications (peer-to-peer architectures and programmatic interfaces) and on the current explosion in social software.

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Brent Sleeper
Brent Sleeper (bsleeper@stencilgroup.com) is partner in The Stencil Group. He has shaped the firmís web services research and consulting practice and is a leading independent expert on this emerging market. His writing on related technology and business topics is widely respected, and he frequently speaks at industry events.

Brent has several years of professional experience helping clients make practical sense of the business opportunities created by Internet-based technologies. He has led and contributed to consulting engagements with a range of established and entrepreneurial businesses, including Compaq Computer Corp., OAG, GE Global Exchange Services, Everest Ecommerce, Crosspoint Venture Partners, First USA Bank, and others.

Before joining The Stencil Group, Brent was a founding member of iXLís strategy practice and most recently served as director of marketing strategy. Previously, as a senior consultant with NetResponse, he helped develop an industry-leading consulting methodology and led the expansion of the companyís operation from Washington, DC, to San Francisco. Brent also worked with National Public Radio and the State of Texas. He is a graduate of Carleton College.

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Bill Smith
Bill Smith is the Director of Liberty Alliance Technology at Sun Microsystems and represents Sun on the Management Board at the Liberty Alliance Project. In addition, he serves as the Secretary of the Alliance.

Smith is the past President of OASIS, an industry consortium that advocates structured information standards like XML. In that capacity, he served on the Executive Committee of ebXML, the joint OASIS/United Nations Electronic Business initiative.

Prior to joining Sun in 1996 he was the Director of Research and Development at Electronic Book Technologies. He holds a bachelor's and master's degree in Computer Science, both from Brown University.

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Juan Carlos Soto
Juan Carlos Soto is the Product Marketing Group Manager for Project JXTA at Sun Microsystems and the jxta.org Open Source Community Manager. On previous projects at Sun, Soto has managed engineering groups implementing Java for small devices and Business Development for Java Software.

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Michael Starkenburg
Michael Starkenburg joined Sprout as Technology Partner in November of 2001. Prior to joining the fund, Michael served as an executive advisor to a number of venture funds (including Sprout) and technology-driven companies. Before his consulting experience, Michael held the positions of Chief Information Officer for Tickets.com, Chief Technology Officer for Cyberian Outpost, Inc, and various technology management positions at America Online, Inc.

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Marc Stiegler
As COO of Combex, Marc Stiegler led the acquisition of a DARPA research contract in June 2001 to build a working prototype of a capability secure desktop that is invulnerable to traditional computer viruses and trojan horses, using the E programming language. Highlights of Stiegler's earlier works include serving as VP of Engineering for Autodesk, and winning the SPA Best New Business Software Award for DecideRight in 1996.

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Damien Stolarz
Damien Stolarz is an entrepreneur with fifteen years of experience making computers talk to each other. He is the CEO of both Robotarmy Corp., a software/R&D consultancy, and Carbot, Inc. an in-car computer company. He authored "Mastering Internet Video" (Addison-Wesley, 2004). Stolarz holds a B.S. in Computer Science/Engineering from UCLA.

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David Stutz
David Stutz has been a professional musician since boyhood. Despite this impediment, he has also managed to actively participate in the evolution of a number of computer languages, programming models, and developer tools - most recently Microsoft's "Rotor" project. As a software architect and kibitzer, he has been involved in the early design stage of many technologies, including software component models, systems, database products, network protocols, and a whole lot of other hard-to-categorize plumbing. Despite repeated attempts to go clean, he remains obsessively attracted to distributed systems, winegrape growing, and the mechanisms of biology.

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Janette Toral
Janette Toral is the founder/president of Philippine Internet Commerce Society.

Toral started her own E-commerce Research Portal last December 1999 with DigitalFilipino.com.

Toral has been frequently invited to various IT conferences in the country to talk about e-commerce, wireless, and outsourcing developments in the Philippines.

As an IT practitioner, Toral has more than 11 years of combined experience in the areas of training, management, sales, technical support, web development, event management, media relations, and project management.

At present, Janette Toral does consulting work to companies who are engaged in outsourcing, application development, business partnership, wireless application targeting international markets. Her articles in DigitalFilipino.com are syndicated to various publication both print and online.

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Kelly Truelove
Kelly Truelove is an independent research analyst who, via Truelove Research, covers peer-to-peer technology with a focus on P2P content search, storage, and distribution networks. He is regarded as a leading expert on consumer file-sharing systems, which he covers with a data-driven approach. He was previously founder & CEO of Clip2, a technology startup company, where he led extensive technical investigations and tracking efforts into extant file-sharing systems and distributed systems development platforms including Gnutella, OpenNap/Napster, FastTrack (Morpheus/KaZaA), Sun's Project JXTA, and XML Web services. Truelove co-authored the O'Reilly Research 2001 P2P Networking Overview and is an O'Reilly Network contributor. He holds a Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley.

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Matt Westervelt
Matt Westervelt founded SeattleWireless in June of 2000. SeattleWireless is focused on creating a public, community built wireless local loop that does not charge for transit within it's boundaries. In addition to SeattleWireless, Matt co-founded FreeNetworks.ORG, which provides a collaboration and communication point to other wireless groups around the globe. Matt works as a Systems Administrator for RealNetworks and is quite fond of the Japanese game of Go.

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Bryce Wilcox-O'Hearn
Bryce Wilcox-O'Hearn leads the Mnet project, an emergent network and universal file space. He has 10 years of experience in the design and implementation of secure distributed systems and digital cash. Wilcox-O'Hearn is also involved in the development of MixMinion, an anonymous remailer network, and E, a secure distributed pure-object platform and p2p scripting language. He founded the p2p-hackers mailing list, and has written about emergent networks, reputation systems, and decentralized namespaces.

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Dave Winer
Dave Winer, 46, is CEO of UserLand Software, a leading Web technology and publishing company based in Millbrae, CA. UserLand makes software suited for writers, designers, graphics people and programmers, designed to make Web development easy and productive.

He is co-developer of Frontier, Manila and Radio UserLand. The company hosts several thousand Web sites using these tools and has pioneered several Internet standards in distributed computing, including SOAP, XML-RPC, RSS and OPML. He is the editor of the pioneering Scripting News weblog.

A software industry veteran, Winer also produced award-winning commercial software products at Living Videotext, merged with Symantec in 1987. He was a contributing editor at Wired in the mid-90s and in 1997 was chosen as a Seybold Fellow for his pioneering work in Web-based publishing systems. In 2001 Wired Magazine honored him with the top award for his work on SOAP. Winer is also a member of the Board of Advisors of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

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Walter Wright
Walter Wright is a Supervisory Special Agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in Washington D.C. He is currently the national program manager for outreach, at the National Infrastructure Protection Center, where he is in charge of the centerís liaison efforts to private industry in the area of computer crimes and infrastructure protection.

As a Special Agent with the FBI, Mr. Wright has extensive experience conducting white collar crime and fraud investigations. He has been assigned to Bank Fraud, Stocks & Bonds, and Governmental Fraud Squads in the FBIís New York field office. He has considerable knowledge of accounting and auditing principles, compiling and analyzing evidence, principles of civil and criminal federal law investigations. Since his assignment to Washington, Mr. Wright has been assigned as a lead investigator to the 105th Congress Select Committee on the Transfer of Technology to China, popularly known as the Cox Committee. He was also an investigator at the Office of the Independent Counsel (OIC).

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Peter Yared
Peter Yared is the founder and CEO of ActiveGrid. Most recently, he was CTO of Sun Microsystems' Liberty Network Identity initiative. Yared was also CTO of Sun Microsystems' Application Server Division. Before its acquisition by Sun, Yared served as CTO of NetDynamics, which pioneered the then-leading J2EE application server. Earlier, he was founder and CEO of JRad Technologies, an enterprise Java company acquired by NetDynamics.

Additionally, Yared was chief architect of client/server products at object-oriented tool maker Prograph International and the architect of several mission-critical systems deployed by U.S. government agencies and the GED Testing Service. Yared holds a B.S. in computer science from the University of Maryland.

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