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Mac DevCenter


Keynotes

Tuesday | Wednesday | Thursday

Tuesday, October 1

The Future is Built In
Tim O'Reilly, O'Reilly Media, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Tuesday, October 01
Time: 8:30am - 9:15am
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

What's so visionary about how Mac OS X picks up the threads of a variety of technologies and spins them into a machine for the 21st century? Tim O'Reilly answers this question with a look at some of the top tech trends he sees reflected in the design and vision of Mac OS X.


Toward Mac OS XX
David Pogue, New York Times; Pogue Press
Track: Keynote
Date: Tuesday, October 01
Time: 9:15am - 10:15am
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

It's taken 17 years to go from System 1.0 to Mac OS X, from 128K of memory to 128 megs, from 400K disks to 40 gigabytes. What will another 17 years bring? David Pogue takes a funny, whirlwind look back, pauses to analyze the promise and perils of Mac OS X, and fast-forwards to 2020 to imagine what's ahead on the road to Mac OS XX.


Mac OS X, a Digital Rights Management Operating System
Dan Gillmor, Center for Citizen Media, Cory Doctorow, University of Southern California, J.D. Lasica, Online Journalism Review, Victor Nemechek, El Gato Software LLC, Tim O'Reilly, O'Reilly Media, Inc.
Track: Keynote
Date: Tuesday, October 01
Time: 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

Mac OS X is becoming, whether by design or by accident, a Digital Rights Management operating system where the rights in question are the user's rights--and they are expansive. Apple's Digital Hub concept continues to take shape in the OS, the add-on applications and third-party products such as EyeTV, typically enhancing the user's ability to do what he or she wants.

Dan Gillmor moderates a panel that considers the issues: Can this distinctly pro-customer approach continue in the face of Hollywood's ire and the entertainment industry's clout in Congress? Will Apple copy Microsoft and build harsh DRM for copyright owners into the system?


Wednesday, October 2

Mac OS X: Unix Moves Out
Jordan Hubbard, Apple
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, October 02
Time: 8:30am - 9:30am
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

Jordan Hubbard discusses Unix's long history in universities, research institutions, and server rooms, and explains the new opportunities Mac OS X represents for the Unix development community.


Discussion: Mac OS X: Unix Moves Out
Jordan Hubbard, Apple, Adam C. Engst, TidBITS and Take Control Books, Tim O'Reilly, O'Reilly Media, Inc., Derrick Story, O'Reilly Network
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, October 02
Time: 9:30am - 10:15am
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

Jordan Hubbard discusses Unix's long history in universities, research institutions, and server rooms, and explains the new opportunities Mac OS X represents for the Unix development community.


Java on the Desktop
James Gosling, Sun Microsystems
Track: Keynote
Date: Wednesday, October 02
Time: 4:00pm - 4:45pm
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

One of the under-appreciated strengths of Java is as a platform for building desktop applications. Mac OS X is a superb desktop. The combination is unbeatable. James Gosling describes why the future is exciting for Java developers on the Mac OS X platform.


Thursday, October 3

Project Hannah: The Origin of Darwin at Apple Computer
Wilfredo Sánchez Vega, Darwin Operating System
Track: Keynote
Date: Thursday, October 03
Time: 8:30am - 9:30am
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

In March 1999, Apple Computer announced that it would distribute its core system software in source form and allow Apple's developer community as well as the broader community to participate in the ongoing evolution of this new and fundamental part Mac OS, fittingly called Darwin. This decision was influenced by a variety of factors, including Darwin's BSD roots and Apple's existing and fruitful relationships with a number of open source groups such as MkLinux, NetBSD, and Apache.

It was not, however, a trivial decision to make. Committing to an open development model requires a philosophical change which affects the culture in which engineers work. It requires new and more intimate communication with external developers. Finally, it took a lot of work to actually make it all happen.

Wilfredo discusses the history that led up to the creation of Darwin, the obstacles that had to be overcome, and the process of putting together the first Darwin operating system distribution. He covers some of the results of this effort in the form of a case study: what worked and what didn't.


Discussion: "Apple and the Open Source Process"
Wilfredo Sánchez Vega, Darwin Operating System, James Duncan Davidson, http://x180.net/
Track: Keynote
Date: Thursday, October 03
Time: 9:30am - 10:15am
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom


My Fantasy Hub
Mark Frauenfelder
Track: Keynote
Date: Thursday, October 03
Time: 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Location: Santa Clara Ballroom

Mark Frauenfelder presents a slideshow of imaginary devices he would like to one day be able to plug into his iMac's Digital Hub. He also answers questions about his experiences as an Apple Switch campaign star.




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