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Mac DevCenter


Speakers

One of the best reasons to attend the O'Reilly Mac OS X Conference is the unprecedented gathering of top-notch presenters, leaders, and experts. You will find core developers, unique users, and visionaries who will share their knowledge with you to help you solve your computing or programming challenges. You won't find a gathering like this at any other conference.

Our speaker list is growing daily. Please check back regularly to see who we have lined up for you.

Chris Adamson
Chris Adamson is the Associate Online Editor for O'Reilly's Java sites ONJava and java.net, is a community manager for java.net's Mac community, and is the author of O'Reilly's upcoming QuickTime for Java: A Developer's Notebook. He also consults on Java Media projects, in the form of his Atlanta-based consulting company Subsequently and Furthermore, Inc.

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Scott Anguish
As a senior technical writer for Apple's Cocoa & Developer Tools group, Scott Anguish is responsible for creating and updating documentation for Apple's Cocoa APIs. Anguish joined Apple's Technical Publications department after co-writing Cocoa Programming, for SAMS. In 1994, he created Stepwise.com, a portal related to NeXT technologies. Today Stepwise serves as a community clearinghouse for the Mac OS X technology platform, as well as Cocoa and WebObjects development articles. Anguish started developing for the Macintosh in 1984. Upon seeing NeXTStep in 1992 he was hooked on the possibilities of a unified imaging model and a pure object-oriented system.

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Michael Beam
Michael Beam is the Cocoa columnist at the O'Reilly Networks's Mac DevCenter. He started programming in Cocoa with Mac OS X public betas. His columns focus on becoming productive in Cocoa, quickly and easily.

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Chris Bourdon
Chris Bourdon is the Senior Product Line Manager for Mac OS X at Apple Computer Inc. where he is responsible for marketing Mac OS X and its innovative technologies. 

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Kevin Burton
Kevin Burton is a long-standing contributor within the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) and has concentrated on Open Source, distributed systems, Java, XML, object oriented design, performance analysis, scalability design, and security engineering. He has created a number of Open Source projects including, Reptile, Apache Jetspeed, Apache Alexandria and also co-founded the Apache Turbine project. All have been very successful, with Jetspeed attracting involvement from companies such as IBM, SAP, and NEC and Turbine now driving some of the most complex applications on the Internet. He is also involved in next generation Software Engineering, and is trying to use the distributed, evolutionary Open Source model to build quality, stable, and scalable software.

Recently, Kevin has been busy working on the OpenPrivacy project. After being co-founded in late 2000, the project has released its first Open Source project, Reptile.

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Stuart Cheshire, Ph.D.
Stuart Cheshire is currently a senior engineer at Apple and is the architect behind Rendezvous, Apple's revolutionary home networking technology. He previously worked on IBM Token Ring with Madge Networks in the UK and has published research papers in the areas of wireless networking and Mobile IP. Cheshire received B.A. and M.A. degrees from Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, UK. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University in California.

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Ivor St. John Clarke
Ivor Clarke is president of Simple Factors, a user interface design firm located in Boulder, CO. After graduating from Carnegie Mellon University with a degree in Human Computer Interaction, he joined Microsoft's Macintosh Business Unit. There he worked on several versions of Office and finally guided the transition to Aqua for Office X.

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Brook Conner
Brook Conner is an author, freelance consultant, and faculty member at NYU. His next book is "Programming Quartz: Advanced 2D Graphics on the Macintosh," forthcoming from O'Reilly. His research papers appear in a number of venues, including ACM SIGGRAPH. In the past, he worked as Director of Product Development at Novix Media, Manager of Technology Assessment at Sony, and Assistant Director of the NSF Science and Technology Center for Computer Graphics and Scientific Visualization. He also consulted with numerous companies, including Microsoft Research, IBM, Motorola, Mitre, Fraunhofer CRCG, the Providence Journal, and Dynamic Diagrams.

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mmalcolm Crawford
Malcolm Crawford works in Apple's Technical Publications Group. Prior to joining Apple, Malcolm was an Apple Certified Trainer, teaching WebObjects and Cocoa Development classes. He was a founder and principal in Cassini Division, a company specialising in content management systems, and in the construction of custom software solutions for small companies through to major corporations. He is also a contributing editor to the Stepwise website.

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Ian Darwin
Ian Darwin is the author of O'Reilly's popular Java Cookbook and the in-progress Tomcat: The Definitive Guide. He has worked with computers since the beginning of time (0x00000000L), with UNIX since 1980 (currently favoring OpenBSD), with Java since 1995, and with MacOS 7, 8, and X. He teaches regularly for Learning Tree International and has presented tutorials at UniForum, the O'Reilly OSCON, Geek Cruises' Java Jam and elsewhere.

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James Duncan Davidson
James Duncan Davidson is a freelance author, software developer, and consultant focusing on Mac OS X and related technologies. He is the author of Running Mac OS X Panther, the coauthor of Mac OS X Panther Hacks (with Rael Dornfest) , the coauthor of Learning Cocoa with Objective-C (with Apple Computer, Inc.), and the coauthor of Cocoa in a Nutshell (with Michael Beam), all published by OReilly Media, as well as publisher of his own web site, x180

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Cory Doctorow
Cory Doctorow (craphound.com) is a science fiction novelist, blogger and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing (boingboing.net), and a contributor to Wired, Popular Science, Make, the New York Times, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (eff.org), a non-profit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards and treaties. Presently, he serves as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

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Glenn Fleishman
Glenn Fleishman is a freelance journalist who writes regularly for the New York Times, Fortune, and Wired, and is the Macintosh columnist for the Seattle Times, Seattle's larger daily newspaper. He has written and worked with wireless networking since Oct. 2000, filing story after story for print and Web publications, including O'Reilly Wireless DevCenter. His Wi-Fi blog (80211b.weblogger.com) has been the No. 1 match for 802.11b for several months running.

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Rob Flickenger
Rob Flickenger has been writing professionally since 2002. He has written and edited several books, including “Building Wireless Community Networks” and “Wireless Hacks”, published by O’Reilly Media. In 2006 he founded Hacker Friendly LLC, an independent publishing company that uses wiki software and print-on-demand technology to produce books. In its first year, Hacker Friendly produced "How To Accelerate Your Internet" bwmo.net and "Wireless Networking in the Developing World" wndw.net, which have been widely distributed in Africa and South America.

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brian d foy
brian d foy has been a dedicated Mac user since a Quadra 650 which he still uses. Seven Macs later, most of them still in use, he deals almost exclusively with Mac OS X for his Perl development work, even if he has to use Virtual PC to cheat. He is also a Perl developer and trainer who maintains several Perl modules on CPAN and publishes The Perl Review, all from his Powerbook.

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Dan Frakes
Dan Frakes is a technology writer, shareware developer, consultant, and long-time Mac user. He is the author of Mac OS X Power Tools, a frequent contributor to Macworld magazine's "Mac OS X Secrets" column and the TidBITS newsletter, contributed to Mac OS X Disaster Relief by Ted Landau, and is an editor/author of the upcoming Mac Bible, 9th Edition. He is also the creator of InformINIT, the award-winning shareware guide to the Classic Mac OS, and a "ListMom" for some of the largest Mac-related mailing lists on the 'Net. Frakes has worked as a programmer/analyst supporting Macs at a major university and as an analyst at a research and consulting firm where his projects included the evaluation of educational technology policy. He is a frequent speaker at Mac-related conferences, and is a ten-time Macworld Expo Conference Faculty.

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Bob Fraser
Bob Fraser is the Java Product Manager, Worldwide Product Marketing for Apple. He first fell in love with rapid application development systems on his Symbolics lisp machine and continues to dabble today with WebObjects. In past lives, he has had practical experience as a software engineer, systems designer, and consultant.

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Mark Frauenfelder
Mark Frauenfelder (mark@well.com) is a writer and illustrator living in Los Angeles. He co-founded bOING bOING magazine, and was the founding editor-in-chief of Wired Online. He was also an editor at Wired magazine and Wired books from 1993-1998. He writes a monthly column for Playboy called "Living Online," about the Internet. He was the lead editor of The Happy Mutant Handbook (Putnam-Berkley, 1995), and recently wrote and illustrated Mad Professor (Chronicle Books, October 2002), a book of bizarre science experiments for children. He is the co-editor of the boingboing.net weblog, and ukulelia (boingboing.net/uke), a blog for ukulele fanatics.

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Landon Fuller
Landon Fuller is an engineer in Apple's BSD Technology Group and one of the primary architects of the Darwin ports system.

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John Geleynse
As the user experience evangelist in Apple's Worldwide Developer Relations group, John Geleynse is responsible for helping developers adopt and design for Aqua, the elegant user interface of Mac OS X. Geleynse has over fourteen years of industry experience as an assembly language programmer, a C/C++ programmer, and he has also held various marketing roles. Prior to joining Apple in 1999, he worked at Corel Corporation.

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Tom Goguen
Tom Goguen is director of server software in Apple's Worldwide Product Marketing group. His team is responsible for the marketing and management of Apple's Mac OS X Server and Apple Remote Desktop products. In 2001, he came to Apple from Eazel, where he was director of product management and was responsible for Eazel's desktop software and Internet services. Prior to that, Goguen held various positions at Sun, most recently working on the company's initiatives in the office of the CTO and previously on Sun's Solaris operating system and related workgroup server software. Goguen holds a masters degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Ottawa, Canada.

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James Gosling
James Gosling is a VP & Fellow at Sun Microsystems. He has built satellite data acquisition systems, a multiprocessor version of Unix, several compilers, mail systems ,and window managers. He has also built a WYSIWYG text editor, a constraint-based drawing editor, and a text editor called "Emacs" for Unix systems.

At Sun, his early activity was as lead engineer of the NeWS window system. He did the original design of the Java programming language and implemented its original compiler and virtual machine. He has recently been a contributor to the Real-Time Specification for Java.

Gosling received a B.Sc. in Computer Science from the University of Calgary, Canada in 1977. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1983. The title of his thesis was "The Algebraic Manipulation of Constraints."

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Alex Grossman
Alex Grossman is director of hardware storage in Apple's Worldwide Product Marketing group. He and his team are responsible for driving the development, marketing and management of Apple's server and storage products. Prior to joining Apple, Grossman was vice president of Sales, Marketing, and New Product Development at MicroNet Technology, Inc., a developer and manufacturer of hardware storage solutions for creative professionals and IT managers. Grossman has contributed to several patents associated with storage technology and led the team that developed the first FireWire-based Storage Area Network.

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Doug Hanley
Doug is a member of the Apple Consultants Network Advisory Council. He founded VMUG, the Las Vegas Macintosh Users Group. He teaches Macintosh Troubleshooting & Maintenance at the Community College of Southern Nevada and is certified as an Area Certified Technical Coordinator who has been supporting Mac users for over 13 years. He is also the Mac Corespondent on the Computer Outlook, a syndicate radio talk show.

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Paul Hoffman
Paul Hoffman is the Director of the Virtual Private Network Consortium, the industry trade association for VPN manufacturers and service providers. He is also the author of 20 computer books including Netscape for Dummies and Perl For Dummies. He bought his first Mac in January 1984.

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Jordan Hubbard
As the Manager of BSD Technologies for Apple's Core OS Engineering team, Jordan Hubbard oversees the BSD Technology Base for Darwin, the UNIX-based core of Mac OS X. Before joining Apple in 2001, Hubbard was a Principal Technologist for Wind River Systems and was responsible for the FreeBSD CD-ROM product line. Prior to that, Hubbard held various engineering and management positions at companies in the US and Europe, such as U.C. Berkeley and Digital Equipment Corporation. He began his career in software in the 1970's, working on minicomputers, and he is a frequent contributor to the Open Source community. Hubbard has been writing free software since 1982, beginning with Volume 1 of the comp.sources.unix archive and continuing with various works on MIT's X Contributed Software collection. He is also a co-founder of the FreeBSD project, which began in 1992.

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Brian Jepson
Brian Jepson is an O'Reilly editor, programmer, and co-author of Mac OS X Panther for Unix Geeks and Learning Unix for Mac OS X Panther. He's also a volunteer system administrator and all-around geek for AS220, a non-profit arts center in Providence, Rhode Island. AS220 gives Rhode Island artists uncensored and unjuried forums for their work. These forums include galleries, performance space, and publications. Brian sees to it that technology, especially free software, supports that mission.

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Jessica Kahn
Jessica Kahn is the engineering team lead for Apple Help on Mac OS X.

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Leander Kahney
Leander Kahney is a journalist who covers Apple and the Mac community for Wired News (www.wired.com). Before joining Wired, he was a senior writer at MacWeek. He has written for numerous publications, including Scientific American and the London Guardian.

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Obul Kambham
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Boris Katok
Boris Katok is a software developer and architect with over ten years of industry experience. In 1996 he founded Dynamical Systems, Ltd., a software development and consulting company. For the past six years, he has been a consultant for a wide range of corporate clients including large investment banks, technology companies, and biotech companies. He specializes in object oriented architectures for n-tiered, distributed, high-performance, scalable, multi-threaded client-server applications and servers, and platform-independent and language-neutral implementations in Java, Perl, and Objective-C. He has been developing on the NeXTSTEP/OPENSTEP platforms since 1994.

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John Labovitz
John Labovitz is a photographer, programmer, and old-time netizen. He has been a typographer/designer and webmaster (working on O'Reilly's GNN site way back in 1993). Since 1985, he's switched back and forth between Mac and Unix. Now he's happier not having to choose between the two.

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Ted Landau
Ted Landau is the author of Sad Macs, Bombs, and Other Disasters and Mac OS X Disaster Relief. He is the founder and original editor of the MacFixIt website and a contributing editor for Macworld magazine. Landau has been twice listed by the MDJ as one of the twenty-five most influential people in the Mac community.

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J.D. Lasica
J.D. Lasica is Senior Editor of the Online Journalism Review (ojr.org), where he writes a column about new media and emerging technologies. Previously, he was Director of Content for an e-commerce startup in Sunnyvale, editor of BabyCenter.com, and a senior manager with San Francisco Sidewalk, Microsoft's online city guide. Lasica was the first new media columnist for The American Journalism Review. In a previous life he was an editor and columnist for The Sacramento Bee. He writes a popular weblog, New Media Musings, at http://jd.manilasites.com. He is currently writing a book about the clampdown on digital rights.

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David Mash
David Mash is Vice President for Information Technology at Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts, charged with strategic planning and leadership in the successful integration of technology into all college processes.

David was chosen by Apple Computer to be one of the first technology visionaries to be included in their AppleMasters program. David has collaborated on development and artistic projects with leaders in the multimedia and music industries such as Kodak, Adobe Systems, Digidesign, Opcode, and Korg and has consulted on product development for many manufacturers of music technology products. Rolling Stone magazine has called David "the industry's leading evangelist for the marriage of music and technology."

David's publications include "Musicians and Computers," Warner Bros; "Musicians and Multimedia," Warner Bros; "Musicians and the Internet," Warner Bros; Macintosh Multimedia Machine, Sybex; and "Computers and the Music Educator," Warner Bros.

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John McIntosh
John McIntosh took over what is now Redstone Software 20 months ago, killed their PC-based testing product, and embarked on a Mac OS X market focused development effort to build a test automation system with true ease-of-use, the ability to test any application on any system, and cost effectiveness.

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Gordon Meyer
Gordon Meyer is a a software engineer, ethnographer, and author. His house in Silicon Valley is fully automated and controlled by a talking computer that wakes his family in the morning, keeps an eye on the dog during the day, and alerts him to missed phone calls and package deliveries.

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David Morrison
David Morrison teaches mathematics at Duke University. He has used both Mac OS and various flavors of Unix in his research and his teaching for many years. He began contributing to the Fink project in July 2001, when he discovered that learning the skills needed to bring his favorite Unix tools to Mac OS X was not so hard after all! His other professional interests include bringing the scientific literature online (www.arXiv.org), and superstring theory.

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Christopher Nagel
Christopher Nagel has been a consultant, developer, and mentor for 12 years. Nagel has worked on object-oriented software for the Department of Defense, Blue Cross, TIAA-CREF, and Apple. Currently, Nagel is authoring O'Reilly's Cocoa Cookbook and lending a hand on some very cool software projects.

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Victor Nemechek
Victor Nemechek, El Gato’s Director of Marketing, manages the non-engineering portion of the energetic, cutting-edge, Macintosh-only software development company. El Gato has earned a reputation as a premier software development organization by creating award-winning products such as Roxio’s Toast 5 Titanium and SmartDisk’s FlashMedia Reader.

Nemechek joined El Gato in 2001 and got the wheels rolling on the development of EyeTV Digital Video Recorder, the first product to be released by El Gato directly to consumers. EyeTV is the first digital video recorder solution for Macintosh to allow customers to watch, record, and pause “live” TV, skip commercials, instant replay, or archive shows to VideoCDs playable in most DVD players.

Prior to joining El Gato, Nemechek was the Macintosh Product Line Manager at Roxio, where he led the development of Toast 5 Titanium, Roxio’s award winning CD and DVD recording software for the Macintosh. He holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from the University of Colorado and an MS in Computer Engineering from the University of Southern California. Mr. Nemechek is married and has twin sons. They reside in San Jose, California.

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Matt Neuburg
Matt Neuburg is the author of O'Reilly's REALbasic: The Definitive Guide. He has been making computers do the work for him since 1968.

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Scott Nichol
Scott Nichol is an independent Mac developer and the author of the shareware application f(x). He also maintains the macmethod.com website. At his real job, Scott is a software engineer specializing in high-precision robotics and automation software for microchip assembly.

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Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly is founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. In addition to publishing pioneering books like Ed Krol's The Whole Internet User's Guide & Catalog (selected by the New York Public Library as one of the most significant books of the twentieth century), O'Reilly has also been a pioneer in the popularization of the Internet. O'Reilly's Global Network Navigator site (GNN, which was sold to America Online in September 1995) was the first Web portal and the first true commercial site on the World Wide Web.

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David O'Rourke
As an engineering manager for Apple's Directory Services, David O'Rourke manages the development for directory client and server technologies in Mac OS X. The specific technologies he addresses include Open Directory, based on LDAP architecture, and Workgroup Manager. O'Rourke joined Apple in 1990 and has since held various quality assurance and engineering positions at the company. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in computer science from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.

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Ed Peterlin
Edward Peterlin is the lead Macintosh developer at BIOPAC Systems, Inc. by day and an OpenOffice.org community contributor by night. A graduate of Princeton University with an engineering degree in Computer Science, he has worked on a variety of large Unix, Macintosh, and Win32 projects, specializing in user interfaces and cross porting. He is currently helping to organize the community effort for completing the OpenOffice.org 1.0 port for MacOS X.

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David Pogue
David Pogue is the weekly technology columnist for the New York Times. He is also the #1 best-selling Macintosh author, having authored "Mac OS X: The Missing Manual" and several other titles in the Missing Manual series, which he created.

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Ernest Prabhakar
As Product Line Manager for Development Platforms, Ernest Prabhakar is responsible for Open Source, Java and XML technologies at Apple. Since joining the company in 1997, Prabhakar has driven a number of new product initiatives at Apple, including the launch of Mac OS X Server and Darwin, Apple's Open Source operating system based on BSD technology. He has been developing on UNIX and Mac OS X-related technology for over fifteen years, beginning with BSD 4.2 at MIT's Project Athena.

Prabhakar received his S.B. in Physics from MIT and his Ph.D. in Experimental Particle Physics from Caltech.

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George Reese
George Reese has taken an unusual path into business software development. After earning a B.A. in philosophy from Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, George went off to Hollywood where he worked on television shows such as The People's Court and ESPN's Up Close. The L.A. riots convinced him to return to Maine, where he finally became involved with software development and the Internet. George has since specialized in the development of Internet-oriented Java enterprise systems. He is the author of Database Programming with JDBC and Java, Second Edition and Java Enterprise Architecture and coauthor of MySQL and mSQL. He created the world's first JDBC driver, the mSQL-JDBC (a.k.a Dasein Soul) driver for mSQL and is most recently involved with the creation of the peer-to-peer Open Source personal digital asset management system, xS. He currently works for Imaginet, LLC. in Minneapolis, MN. You can visit his home page at http://www.imaginary.com/~george.

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Lorene Romero
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Kent Salas
Kent Salas is a web producer for the Los Angeles Newspaper Group and is also known as the “Webmonkey Boy.” He also holds the sought after title of “Apple Product Professional” in Apple’s Learn & Earn program. His history with Mac goes all the way back to Apple’s “Fat Mac” in 1985. When he gets the itch, and some free time, he devises ways to alter Mac and PC hardware with the help of his son.

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Wilfredo Sánchez Vega
Wilfredo Sánchez is a 1995 graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After MIT, he co-founded an Internet publishing company, Agora Technology Group, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and then worked on the electronic commerce back end for the Disney Store Online at Disney Online in North Hollywood, California. Sánchez spent three years as a senior software engineer at Apple Computer in Cupertino, where he worked primarily on the BSD subsystem in Mac OS X as a member of the Core Operating System group, and as engineering lead for Apple's open source projects. He went on to join KnowNow, a startup in Mountain View, as developer community manager. Sánchez is also a member of the Apache Software Foundation, and a contributor to various other projects.

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Randal L. Schwartz
Randal L. Schwartz is a two-decade veteran of the software industry--skilled in software design, system administration, security, technical writing, and training. He has co-authored the "must-have" standards: Programming Perl, Learning Perl, Learning Perl Objects, References, and Modules, and Effective Perl Programming, as well as writing regular columns for several magazines. His offbeat humor and technical mastery have reached legendary proportions worldwide (but he probably started some of those legends himself). Since 1985, Randal has owned and operated Stonehenge Consulting Services, Inc.

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Michael Shaff
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Rich Siegel
Rich Siegel is the founder, president, and CEO of Bare Bones Software, Inc.

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Dori Smith
Dori Smith is co-author of Mac OS X Unwired and JavaScript for the WWW: Visual QuickStart Guide, 5th Edition, author of Java 2 for the WWW: Visual QuickStart Guide, and a contributor to numerous online and print magazines. She is on the Steering Committee for the Web Standards Project, and is Publisher and ListMom for the Wise-Women's Web organization.

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Sal Soghoian
Sal Soghoian is an AppleScript Product Manager, Worldwide Product Marketing for Apple. He is widely touted as "the" AppleScript Guru and driving force behind the continued expansion and acceptance of AppleScript. He began scripting in 1992, after discovering AppleScript could automate the publishing-related tasks at his service bureau. After spending years as an early "online evangelist," Sal continued to serve the AppleScript community as the AppleScript Product Manager at Apple. Throughout his tenure, AppleScript's importance, use, and integration has grown, becoming the indispensable tool for automation and communication on the Mac.

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Daniel Steinberg
Daniel Steinberg is the editor-in-chief of O'Reilly Media's Java publications java.net and ONJava.com.

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Ted Stevko
Ted Stevko has been a network administrator, a graphic designer, a programmer, a cartoonist and an illustrator, usually all at once. Currently working as a Java developer using J2EE web services to develop high-availabilty websites, he's wrangled with graphics and programming problems for the last seven years, both from a development point of view and a technical point of view. Frequently, you can find him working on new ideas, including a frighteningly thought-out concept for object-oriented LOGO.

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Damien Stolarz
Damien Stolarz is an entrepreneur with fifteen years of experience making computers talk to each other. He is the CEO of both Robotarmy Corp., a software/R&D consultancy, and Carbot, Inc. an in-car computer company. He authored "Mastering Internet Video" (Addison-Wesley, 2004). Stolarz holds a B.S. in Computer Science/Engineering from UCLA.

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Chris Stone
Chris Stone is the Senior Macintosh Systems Administrator for O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. and has been an extremely avid Mac user, fan, and explorer for fifteen years, professionally since 1997. His own introduction to Unix was with Rhapsody/Mac OS X Server 1.0, and he knows well the challenges and rewards awaiting advanced Mac users equally curious to dive into Mac OS’s Unix.

He wrote the two Terminal chapters for David Pogue’s best-selling Mac OS X: The Missing Manual, as well as several popular articles on learning Mac OS X Unix for O’Reilly’s Mac DevCenter.

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Derrick Story
Derrick Story is the managing editor of O'Reilly Network. He focuses on web authoring, multimedia, and mobile computing. Pet projects include O'Reilly DevCenters for JavaScript/CSS and for the Macintosh. Derrick's experience includes more than 15 years as a photojournalist, a stint as the managing editor for Web Review, and a speaker for CMP's web conferences. In his spare time, Derrick manages his online photo business, Story Photography.

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Rhonda Stratton
As Apple’s Senior QuickTime Product Line Manager Rhonda Stratton is responsible for the continued development of the QuickTime platform. Having been involved with QuickTime and desktop video for over nine years, Stratton currently manages a wide variety of issues including overseeing technical developments, marketing strategy, and developer relationships for QuickTime. Stratton's previous experience at Apple also includes a role as a QuickTime Evangelist when Apple Computer hired her to evangelize and launch QuickTime 2.0. Prior to joining Apple, Stratton was employed with Radius Inc., where she held several video-related positions, most recently as Director of Marketing for the Company. While at Radius, she shipped her first QuickTime-based product, a tool for adding special effects to video, just after QuickTime 1.0 was released in 1991. Stratton is a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and an IEEE member. She holds a B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Toledo.

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Joseph Strout
Joe Strout has been an engineer at REAL Software since the turn of the century. His particular areas of interest are graphics and imaging, including text rendering and game development. Joe also serves on the editorial board of RB Developer magazine (RBD), and writes freelance articles for both RBD and MacTech. In a former life, Joe studied the biophysics and neuroscience of the visual system.

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Dan Sugalski
Dan Sugalski is the lead designer and alleged head of the Parrot project, tasked with designing the world's fastest and most full-featured z-code capable virtual machine. (It will also run Perl 5, Perl 6, Ruby, and Python code for extra flexibility in text gaming) He's been at this for near four years with no sign of land yet, though as long as he avoids the dragons he figures things can't be too bad.

He's also been a long-time contributor to Perl 5, for a while handling much of the VMS Perl port, tried very hard to get the original Perl threading model working, and has written more than a dozen XS-only Perl modules, all of which likely explain this bio.

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Leon Towns-von Stauber
Leon Towns-von Stauber has been using and administering Unix systems for the past twelve years. The purchase of a NeXT workstation in 1991 introduced him to the operating system lineage that he would follow to Mac OS X. He is currently writing a book on Mac OS X system administration to be published by O'Reilly.

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Guy (Bud) Tribble, M.D.-Ph.D.
Dr. Tribble's role at Apple is to help set the long term technical direction for the Mac OS software engineering group. Prior to his current role at Apple he was Vice President of Engineering at Eazel Inc., which developed next generation user interface software and Internet services designed to make Linux based computers easier to use.

Dr. Tribble is one of the industry's noted experts in object oriented programming and user interface design. Prior to joining Eazel he was VP and Chief Technology Officer for the Sun-Netscape Alliance, responsible for guiding Internet and e-commerce software R&D. He held several VP level positions at Sun over seven years. Dr. Tribble began his career at Apple Computer where in 1981 he was manager of the original Macintosh Software team, helping to design the MacOS and user interface. In 1985, he helped found NeXT Computer, where he was Vice President of Software Engineering and a key architect of the NextStep operating system, a groundbreaking software environment.

Dr. Tribble earned a B.A. degree in Physics at the University of California, San Diego and a M.D. and Ph.D. in Biophysics and Physiology at the University of Washington, Seattle.

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Kevin van Vechten
Kevin van Vechten is core team member of the Open Darwin project and a significant contributor to the Darwin ports project.

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David Wheeler
David E. Wheeler enjoys hacking on Stikkit, contributing articles about the PostgreSQL RDBMS for O'ReillyNet, and dabbling with an advanced object-relational mapper he has been designing and implementing for several years. He also works hard to prevent his rather dry wit from causing confusion in others.

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