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Speakers

One of the best reasons to attend the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference is the unprecedented gathering of top-notch presenters, leaders, and experts. Core developers, unique users, and visionaries share their knowledge with you to help you solve your computing or programming challenges. You won't find a gathering like this at any other conference.

Our speaker list is growing daily. Please check back regularly to see who we have lined up for you.

Cheri Anderson
Cheri Anderson is the technology director for SRI Consulting Business Intelligence's VALS Program, which specializes in developing country-specific segmentations and applying these segmentations to create business strategy and long range plans. She directs work on the methodology underlying the VALS approach and develops tools to make the VALS segmentations accessible to a variety of users. Anderson also works on futures projects, focused on how key uncertainties, macro trends and wild cards are likely to play out in the next 5 to 20 years. Before joining SRIC-BI, Anderson was a strategic planner at DDB, an advertising agency. She earned her bachelor's degree in communication studies from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and her master's and doctoral degrees in mass communication from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. She can be reached at canderson@sric-bi.com.

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Jeff Barr
Jeff Barr is senior evangelist for Amazon Web Services. In this role, focuses on helping the Amazon Web Services developer community achieve success in building innovative and successful businesses using Amazon.com data and technology. He served as a liaison for O’Reilly & Associates technical guidebook, "Amazon Hacks." Jeff has held development and management positions at KnowNow, eByz, Akopia, and Microsoft, and was a co-founder of Visix Software. He earned his bachelor degree in Computer Science from the American University.

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Eric Blossom
Eric Blossom is CTO of Blossom Research. He is the maintainer of GNU Radio, a toolkit that turns radio reception and transmission into software problems. Prior to his interest in software radio, Blossom was the founder and CTO of Starium, where he was responsible for the design and development of a line of secure telephones.

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Eric Bonabeau, Ph.D.
Eric Bonabeau is the founder and chief scientist of Icosystem Corporation, a Boston-based “idea incubator” that uses computational evolution to invent novel business models, design new products and create new strategies. Before Icosystem he was the CEO of Eurobios and has been a research director for France Telecom R&D, an R&D engineer at Cadence Design Systems, and the Interval Research Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute. He is the author of three books, over one hundred science articles, and is co-editor-in-chief of Advances in Complex Systems and of ACM Transactions in Adaptive Autonomous Systems. A graduate of Ecole Polytechnique and of Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Télécommunications in Paris, he earned a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from the University of Paris at Orsay.

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Rick Borovoy
Understanding the ways technology can enhance social interactions has been the focus of Rick Borovoy's research for over a dozen years. At the MIT Media Lab, his research in folk computing and technology for face-to-face community building led to his creation of the first interactive name badges. Successful demonstrations of these badges produced so much interest that, together with his partner, George Eberstadt, Borovoy founded nTAG Interactive to bring his work to a broader audience.

Borovoy's vision began to develop during his five years at Apple Computer in the Classrooms of Tomorrow project where he studied the way wireless applications can facilitate kids' learning through the creation of distributed communities.

Borovoy holds a Ph.D. in Media Arts and Sciences from MIT and a B.A. in Computer Science from Harvard.

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Stewart Butterfield
Stewart Butterfield is a director of product management at Yahoo! where he oversees the development of Flickr.com. He also co-founded and acted as CEO of Flickr's parent company, Ludicorp, before its acquisition by Yahoo! in the spring of 2005.

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L. F. (Felipe) Cabrera, Ph.D.
Felipe Cabrera is the Vice President of Software Development for Amazon Web Services. He draws on more than 20 years of experience in the software industry to help Amazon identify and expose technology and data that enables external software and Web developers to innovate and build businesses on their own.

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Marc Canter
Marc Canter is CEO of Broadband Mechanics, a company which is “bringing social to software”. Marc’s background is that he started a company called MacroMind - which became Macromedia - so he’s been in the software business for 23 years - and counting. Marc’s focus has been on open standards and the burgeoning world of open social networking. Panels, speeches, lectures, rants and embarrassing questions are his techniques to bring these issues up in public - around the world.

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Maciej Ceglowski
Maciej Ceglowski is lead developer at the Vermont-based National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education, where he helps to create advanced open source search engines and runs the NITLE Blog Census (http://www.blogcensus.net). He is an avid Perl programmer and the author of several CPAN modules, including Search::ContextGraph, WWW::Blog::Identify, and AI::General. He keeps a weblog at www.idleworlds.com.

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Stuart Cheshire, Ph.D.
Stuart Cheshire is currently a senior engineer at Apple and is the architect behind Rendezvous, Apple's revolutionary home networking technology. He previously worked on IBM Token Ring with Madge Networks in the UK and has published research papers in the areas of wireless networking and Mobile IP. Cheshire received B.A. and M.A. degrees from Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge, UK. He holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University in California.

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Tom Coates
Tom Coates is a leading social software practitioner and early weblogger interested in the shape of the web to come and how to make neat stuff that thrives in it. He's just started looking after a London splinter cell of Yahoo's Tech Development group after two years of running a small R&D team for the BBC exploring future media navigation, annotation and distribution. He's also worked for many of the UKs most prominent web companies including Time Out and UpMyStreet where he developed the geo-coded community UpMyStreet Conversations. He writes a bunch of stuff at plasticbag.org and looks after an experimental online community at barbelith.com.

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Geoff Cohen
Geoff Cohen, Ph.D. is a consultant and writer on the future of software. He is a member of the Program Committee of Onward!: Seeking New Paradigms and New Thinking. His research interests include biological models of computing, new software development methodologies, and social software.

He has worked for the Cap Gemini Ernst & Young Center for Business Innovation, IBM, Data General, and the Congressional Budget Office. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Duke University and a B.A. from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University.

His website is www.coherenceengine.com

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James Cronin
James Cronin is a technologist who has been working on the UK Internet scene since 1993 as developer, systems administrator, technical director or CTO for several top UK's ISPs and new media companies. Cronin was among the first to be hired by boo.com where he was Vice President of Technology and Operations. He pressed the button to launch the web site and pressed the button to shut it down. James currently works for BBCi New Media and BBC News Online as a consultant technical architect and as technical lead of the BBC social software project. Outside of work, Cronin has been active in award-winning e-democracy campaigns, such as the anti internet snooping bill site: Stand. He also co-founded the volunteer-run service: FaxYourMP. In his (copious!) spare time he is part of the team running one of the UK's most successful online communities. Cronin believes strongly in the Internet as an enabling technology for change and spends a lot of time helping Greenpeace and Friends of the Earth with their online campaigns.

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John Cuadrado
John Cuadrado is an independent consultant with extensive experience designing and building artificial intelligence systems for several government agencies. He holds a doctorate in mathematics from the University of Illinois, and has an eclectic range of interests, including data mining, image processing, and distributed computing. He has been working with National Institute for Technology and Liberal Education to make advanced search technologies accessible to users who may not have a programming background.

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Rael Dornfest
Rael Dornfest is Founder and CEO of Portland, Oregon-based Values of n. Rael leads the Values of n charge with passion, unearthly creativity, and a repertoire of puns and jokes — some of which are actually good. Prior to founding Values of n, he was O'Reilly's Chief Technical Officer, program chair for the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, series editor of the bestselling Hacks book series, and instigator of O'Reilly's Rough Cuts early access program. He built Meerkat, the first web-based feed aggregator, was champion and co-author of the RSS 1.0 specification, and has written and contributed to six O'Reilly books. Rael's programmatic pride and joy is the nimble, open source blogging application Blosxom, the principles of which you'll find in the Values of n philosophy and embodied in Stikkit: Little yellow notes that think.

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K. Eric Drexler, Ph.D.
K. Eric Drexler is a researcher concerned with emerging technologies and their consequences for the future. In the mid 1980s, he introduced the term 'nanotechnology' to describe atomically precise molecular manufacturing systems and their products. Advanced nanotechnologies will make possible many dreams (and nightmares) first articulated in the literature of science fiction.

After presenting the basic concepts of molecular manufacturing in a scientific paper (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1981), he wrote Engines of Creation (1986) to introduce a broad audience to the prospect of advanced nanotechnologies -- their nature, promise, and dangers -- and Nanosystems (AAP 1992 Most Outstanding Computer Science Book) to provide a graduate-level introduction to the fundamental physical and engineering principles of the field.

He has lectured in the US, Europe, and Japan to audiences ranging from corporate research laboratories and the World Economic Forum to a satellite-linked network of elementary school classes. In support of U.S. federal policy development, he has provided presentations and briefings to (among others) the Senate Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

He is a founder and current Chairman of the Foresight Institute, a nonprofit educational organization established to help prepare for advanced technologies.

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Christian Dubiel
Christian Dubiel co-founded FHP Wireless in early 2000 and has played a leadership role driving corporate strategy for the company inception. Dubiel currently heads strategic partnership and business development efforts for FHP. Previously, he spent five years as a venture capitalist investing communications and software start-ups.

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Randy Dunlap
Randy Dunlap has worked on Linux since 1999 in various roles at Intel, OSDL, and Oracle. He was the USB subsystem maintainer for one year and the Kernel Janitors patch maintainer for one year. Most recently he has been attacking power management for SATA and PATA hard drives as well as various other patches. He has a backlog of Linux work that he would like to complete.

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Schuyler Erle
Schuyler Erle is a free software developer and activist. He is responsible for NoCatAuth, an early open source wireless captive portal, and geocoder.us, an open source U.S. address geocoder. Erle wrote O'Reilly's Mapping Hacks with Jo Walsh and Rich Gibson, and Google Map Hacks, also with Rich.

Presently, he works with MetaCarta in Cambridge, MA, USA, developing nitfy geographic projects like OpenLayers, an open source web mapping framework written in pure JavaScript, and Gutenkarte, a service for exploring the geographic dimension of classic works of literature. Erle is proud to be a founding member of the OSGeo Foundation.

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Matt Ettus
Matt Ettus, N2MJI, has a Master's Degree in EE from Carnegie Mellon University, where he studied spread spectrum and ad-hoc networks. After a couple of years working on GPS systems at Integrinautics Corp., he now does communication system architecture and DSP design for Zeevo, Inc, a leading Bluetooth semiconductor company. In his free time, Ettus designs software and hardware for GNURadio. Ettus is also a licensed radio amateur (N2MJI) and lives in the Bay Area.

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Glenn Fleishman
Glenn Fleishman is a freelance journalist who writes regularly for the New York Times, Fortune, and Wired, and is the Macintosh columnist for the Seattle Times, Seattle's larger daily newspaper. He has written and worked with wireless networking since Oct. 2000, filing story after story for print and Web publications, including O'Reilly Wireless DevCenter. His Wi-Fi blog (80211b.weblogger.com) has been the No. 1 match for 802.11b for several months running.

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Matthew Gast
Matthew Gast is Director of Consulting Engineering at Trapeze Networks. Prior to Trapeze, he was a member of the business development team at NetScreen, where he worked with strategic partners and alliances. Matthew's most recent book, 802.11 Wireless Networks: The Definitive Guide (O'Reilly Media), is a well-respected and best-selling reference on that rapidly emerging technology, now in its second edition. He is also an active participant in the Wireless LAN Security Initiative at the Interop Labs (iLabs), where he works with other net workers to deploy cutting-edge wireless LAN security solutions.

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Paolo Gaudiano, Ph.D.
Dr. Gaudiano brings to this project a strong combination of relevant scientific and business experience. As a faculty member at Boston University between 1991 and 1998, he specialized in the application of neural networks to the control of mobile robots. He founded the Neurobotics Laboratory, where his group carried out research ranging from adaptive robot control to smart sensors, with successful technology transfers to the military and to industry. In early 1999 he joined Artificial Life, a company that applied biologically inspired techniques to a variety of Internet usage and navigation problems. In late 1999, he founded a company to foster business and technology exchanges between Italy and the U.S. Throughout this period, he maintained an active robotics research program at Boston University. In October 2001, he joined Icosystem Corporation, where he applies his scientific and business skills to problems in complex systems, swarm intelligence, and self-organization. He holds a B.S. in Applied Mathematics and an M.S. in Aerospace Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder, and a Ph.D. in Cognitive and Neural Systems from Boston University.

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Rich Gibson
Rich Gibson is a Perl/Database programmer in Santa Rosa. He has worked professionally with computers since 1982 when he created Public Utility Rate Case Models in SuperCalc on an Osborne II. While the technology has changed, his fascination with using finger muscle power to control electrical impulses has not.

His current fascination is creating tools to aid in the acquisition, management, and presentation of information with a geographic component. He is currently converting an old golf cart into a mobile geo annotation platform.

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Peter Goldie
Peter is Vice-President of Corporate Marketing at Macromedia. Peter is currently focused on marketing of Rich Internet Applications and was co-executive producer of the intro™ application. Since joining Macromedia he has served as a general manager of the Rich Media business unit, and led product management and marketing for a variety of products including Macromedia Flash, FreeHand and Director. Prior to joining Macromedia, he was general manager of the entertainment business unit of Alias|Wavefront, responsible for the Maya business. Peter was also a Brand Manager at Procter & Gamble and has a B.COMM from Queen’s University.

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Ben Hammersley
Ben Hammersley is a writer, journalist, and professional adventurer. He covers technology for the British national press, and has written and Developing Feeds for RSS and Atom for O'Reilly, amongst other things. He lives in Florence, Italy, and is currently training for an expedition to the North Pole.

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Andy Hertzfeld
Andy was a principal member of the original Macintosh team, writing much of the original operating system and user interface toolbox for Apple's revolutionary computer. He left Apple in 1984 and has since co-founded three innovative companies: Radius (1986), General Magic (1990) and Eazel (1999). He is passionate about making computers easier and more fun to use, and is convinced that developing and improving free software is the best way to do that.

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Tom Hoffman
Tom Hoffman is manager of SchoolTool, an initiative funded by the Shuttleworth Foundation to create an open source IT framework for schools. Hoffman has worked as a public high school English teacher and technology coordinator in Providence, Rhode Island. He has developed applications for schools using Python, Zope, and RDF.

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Marcelo Hoffmann
Marcelo Hoffmann has over 22 years of experience helping large organizations better use information technology to develop new products and processes. He monitors technology developments in advanced computing and writes about their business implications for the Explorer (http://www.sric-bi.com/Explorer/) multi-client service. He specializes in knowledge management, collaborative computing, and e-learning and has lectured on these subjects in North and South America, Japan, and Europe. He is the co-author of Knowledge Management for the Adaptive Organization (Spring 1996) and has written a number of technology-related publications for SRI Consulting's Business Intelligence Program. In 2000, he collaborated with Dr. Douglas Engelbart, inventor or the computer mouse and developer of the first hypertext system, to develop and present a Stanford University colloquium on large-scale organizational improvement strategies: "The Unfinished Revolution" (http://bootstrap.org/colloquium/). He was an early participant in the conceptualization and development of the Smart Valley project under Joint Venture/Silicon Valley development initiative, and has carried out a large number of technology management projects for international corporations. Marcelo received a B.S. in industrial technology and M.S. in cybernetic systems, from San Jose State University. He is a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and is past chairman of the Silicon Valley chapter of the IEEE Computer Society.

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Meg Hourihan
Meg Hourihan is a writer and technologist with more than eight years of experience in Web design and application development. Hourihan is also a highly regarded expert on all things weblog -- from their social implications to the development of advanced blogging systems. Her work as the co-founder and director of development at Pyra Labs led to the creation of Blogger, the popular weblogging tool that fueled the current blogging explosion. Hourihan is a regular speaker at technology conferences and she is the co-author of, "We Blog: Publishing Online with Weblogs." She is also a monthly columnist for the O'Reilly Network. Hourihan recently moved to New York City to direct a new media project. You can keep up with her at www.megnut.com.

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Andrew Huang
Andrew "bunnie" Huang is a nocturnal hacker and the hardware lead; his responsibilities include the architecture, design and production of the chumby's electronics, as well as writing drivers for and maintaining the Linux kernel on the chumby. With a PhD in EE from MIT, he has completed several major projects, ranging from hacking the Xbox (and writing the eponymous book), to designing the world's first fully-integrated photonic-silicon chips running at 10 Gbps with Luxtera, Inc., to building some of the first prototype hardware for silicon nanowire device research with Caltech.

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Tom Igoe
Tom Igoe teaches courses in physical computing and networking devices. His current research focuses on ecologically sustainable practices in technology development. Along with Dan O'Sullivan, he co-authored the book "Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers," which has been adopted by numerous digital art and design programs around the world.

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David S. Isenberg
David S. Isenberg spent 12 years at AT&T Bell Labs, until his 1997 essay,"The Rise of the Stupid Network," was received with acclaim everywhere in the global telecommunications community with one exception -- at AT&T itself!

Isenberg left AT&T in 1998 to found isen.com (an independent telecom analysis firm based in Cos Cob, Connecticut) and to publish The SMART Letter, an open-minded commentary on the communications revolution and its enemies.

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Xeni Jardin
Xeni Jardin manages conferences and executive summits exploring technology, media, finance, and culture, and writes for a variety of print and online publications. She is co-editor of BoingBoing, a collaborative weblog and "Directory of Wonderful Things."

As a freelance journalist, her work appears in publications including WIRED Magazine, WIRED News, Grammy Magazine, DGA (Directors Guild of America) Magazine, GOTHAM, Daily Candy, Silicon Alley Reporter (now Venture Reporter), Digital Coast Reporter, and other technology, business, and lifestyle publications.

Prior to launching her consultancy practice in September 2001, she was Vice President of Rising Tide Studios (RTS), the publishing company behind Silicon Alley Reporter, Digital Coast Reporter, and other publications. Xeni served as Senior Writer and oversaw the company's annual conference series, which included The Rising Tide Summit (hosted by Charlie Rose of television's "The Charlie Rose Show" and "60 Minutes II), Silicon Alley 2001, Wireless 2001, The International Network, Internet Healthcare 2001, The Venture Capital Summit, Digital Coast 2000, as well as a series of invite-only CEO gatherings chronicled in the Silicon Alley Daily and Digital Coast Daily online magazines.

Before joining RTS, she managed communications and helped launch a technology company with former top executives from Sun, BEA, PriceWaterhouseCoopers, and Infoseek/GO Network.

An experienced manager of large-scale, business-critical intranet, extranet and public-facing information networks, she was previously Supervisor of Enterprise Web Technology at Latham & Watkins, one of the world's largest law firms. There she was responsible for designing and implementing web-hosted applications, and the online litigation support projects she directed were cited as industry-leading examples of legal technology.

Based in Southern California, Xeni works primarily in New York, Los Angeles, and Silicon Valley.

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Steve Jurvetson
VC investor in Hotmail (MSFT), Interwoven (IWOV), and Kana (KANA). He also led the firm's investments in Tradex (acquired by Ariba for $6B) and Cyras (acquired by Ciena for $2B), and most recently, in pioneering companies in nanotechnology and molecular electronics. Previously, Jurvetson was an R&D engineer at Hewlett-Packard, where seven of his communications chip designs were fabricated. His prior technical experience also includes programming, materials science research (TEM atomic imaging of GaAs), and computer design at HP's PC Division, the Center for Materials Research, and Mostek.

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Brewster Kahle
Since the mid-1980s, Brewster has focused on developing transformational technologies for information discovery and digital libraries. In 1989 Brewster invented the Internet’s first publishing system, WAIS (Wide Area Information Server) system and in 1989, founded WAIS Inc., a pioneering electronic publishing company that was sold to America Online in 1995. In 1996, Brewster founded Internet Archive, the largest publicly accessible, privately funded digital archive in the world. At the same time, he co-founded Alexa Internet in April 1996, which was sold to Amazon.com in 1999. Alexa's services are bundled into more than 80% of Web browsers.

Brewster earned a B.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1982. As a student, he studied artificial intelligence with Marvin Minsky and W. Daniel Hillis. In 1983, Brewster helped start Thinking Machines, a parallel supercomputer maker, serving there as lead engineer for six years. He is profiled in Digerati: Encounters with the Cyber Elite (HardWired, 1996). He was selected as a member of the Upside 100 in 1997, Micro Times 100 in 1996 and 1997, and Computer Week 100 in 1995.

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Mitchell Kapor
Mitchell Kapor is active in the world of open source software as the founder and president of the Open Source Applications Foundation, which is developing Chandler, a new personal information manager, and as chair of the Mozilla Foundation. Kaporl founded Lotus Development Corporation in 1982 and designed Lotus 1-2-3, the "killer app" which made the PC ubiquitous in business. He is also the co-founder (in 1990) of the Electronic Frontier Foundation and currently serves as a director of the Mitchell Kapor Foundation and of the Level Playing Field Institute.

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Alan Kay
Alan Kay is one of the earliest pioneers of personal computing, and his research continues today.

At the Utah ARPA Project in 1966, inspired by Sketchpad, Simula, biology and algebra, he invented dynamic object-oriented programming.

In 1967-9 he and Ed Cheadle invented the FLEX Machine, a very early modern desktop machine they called a "personal com-puter". It had a display, a pointing and drawing tablet, a multiple window graphical user interface, and the first object oriented operating system.

During this time he also participated in the design of the ARPAnet, the forerunner of the Internet.

In 1968, after a visit to Seymour Papert's early LOGO work with children, he designed "a personal computer for children of all ages" — the Dynabook — in the form of a very portable notebook, with a flat-screen, stylus, wireless network, and local storage.

At Xerox PARC in the early 70s he invented Smalltalk, which was the first complete dynamic object oriented language, development, and operating system. It is still the leading such system today, especially in the free open-source version called Squeak.

At PARC he was one of the instigators for the first bitmap displays (that all computers use today), and the main inventor of the now ubiquitous overlapping windows, icons, point-click-and-drag user interface.

He was head of one of several groups at PARC that together created much of modern computing, including: the personal com-puter with bitmap display, overlapping windows GUI, WYSIWYG word processing & desktop publishing, object-oriented OS, music synthesis, painting and animation, laser printing, ethernet, client-server (and peer-peer) networking, and parts of the Inter-net.

Most of his contributions from 1968 onwards have been the result of trying to invent and test better learning environments, mainly for children.

He has been a Xerox Fellow, Chief Scientist of Atari, Apple Fellow, and Disney Fellow. In 2001 he founded Viewpoints Re-search Institute, a non-profit organization located in Glendale, CA. He recently joined the Hewlett-Packard Co. as a Senior Fellow at HP Labs.

Formal Education: BA in Mathematics and Molecular Biology with minor concentrations in English and Anthropology from the University of Colorado, 1966. MS and PhD in Computer Science (both with distinction) from the University of Utah, 1968 and 1969.

He started in show business as a professional jazz guitarist. Much of his subsequent work combined music and theatrical production. Today he is an avid amateur classical pipe organist.

Honors include: J-D Warnier Prix d'Informatique, ACM Systems Software Award, Computers & Communication Foundation Prize, Lewis Branscomb Technology Award, etc.

He has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Royal Society of Arts.

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Joe Kraus
Joe Kraus is co-founder and CEO of JotSpot, the first application-wiki company. A long time entrepreneur, Kraus has been involved with early-stage technology development and starting companies for more than twelve years. Upon graduation from Stanford University in 1993, he joined with five engineering friends to found the highly successful internet company, Excite, Inc. The original president of Excite, Kraus was deeply involved in product strategy, direction, and vision as the company grew. He also held senior operational roles in business development, international development, and content.

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Raffi C. Krikorian
Raffi Krikorian makes a career of hacking everything and anything. During his stints as a MIT student he developed a Java-based distributed/mobile software agent infrastructure while also investigating human perception of sound in zero-g with NASA. He finished off by studying and building tiny, embedded, and sub-$5 Internet nodes and by teaching students "How To Make (Almost) Anything".

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Kevin Lynch
As senior vice president and chief software architect, Kevin Lynch leads Adobe's Platform Business Unit, which is focused on advancing the company's software platform for the creation and delivery of engaging applications and content to any desktop or device. Lynch is responsible for the company's ubiquitous Portable Document Format (PDF), Adobe Reader, and Macromedia Flash Player, as well as alignment of Adobe's servers and tools with the company's technology platform.

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Rajiv P. Patel, Esq.
Rajiv P. Patel is partner in the Intellectual Property Group of Fenwick & West LLP, a law firm specializing in high technology matters. Fenwick & West is headquartered in Mountain View, California, with offices in San Francisco, California and Washington, D.C. Mr. Patel represents companies from privately held start-ups to publicly traded corporations on a wide variety of complex intellectual property issues and matters. Mr. Patel counsels companies on patent portfolio development and management strategies, patent enforcement strategies, and patent and high technology licensing agreements, and strategies. Mr. Patel also leads intellectual property audits to help companies identify key intellectual assets and evaluate protection options for such assets. Mr. Patel has legal, technical, and business experience representing companies in high technology areas that include wireless communications, electronics, complex computer hardware architecture, complex software architecture, electro-mechanical devices, and nanotechnology applications. Mr. Patel also has legal, technical and business experience representing technology think-tanks and traditional non-technology companies for patent and other intellectual property matters. Among the clients Mr. Patel has represented are: § Logitech, Inc. § GEC-Plessy Semiconductor, Inc. § Speedera Networks, Inc. § GameTech International, Inc. § Caspian Networks, Inc. § NorthPole USA, Ltd. § Fujitsu Processor Technologies § Canon Research Center Americas, Inc. Mr. Patel is an Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law where he teaches a course on patents. Mr. Patel has also been a lecturer and instructor on intellectual property and patent law topics for Federal Publication Seminars and Practising Law Institute. In addition, Mr. Patel has authored articles in the field of intellectual property portfolio development and management strategies. Mr. Patel received his Bachelor of Science (with high honors) in Electrical Engineering from Rutgers University (NJ). He received his Juris Doctor and Master of Intellectual Property from Franklin Pierce Law Center (NH). Mr. Patel is a member of the California Bar and is registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Mr. Patel has served as a judicial intern to Chief Judge Joseph A. DiClerico, U.S. District Court, District of New Hampshire. Prior to attending law school, Mr. Patel was an engineer with IBM Corporation, where he received recognition awards for technical excellence.

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Eric Paulos
Eric Paulos (paulos@intel-research.net) is a Research Scientist at Intel's new Research Laboratory in Berkeley, California. Paulos received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley. His research, scientific, and social interests revolve around mediated human communication tools, non-verbal cues, robotics, and internet based tele-embodiment, particularly the physical, aural, visual, and gestural interactions between humans and machines, and various permutations of these interactions. He has developed several Internet based tele-operated robots including Mechanical Gaze in 1995 and Personal Roving Presence devices (PRoPs) such as Space Browsing helium-filled tele-operated blimps and ground based PRoP systems (1995-2000). Paulos is a founding member of the IEEE Technical Committee for Internet Telepresence and is respected as an important contributor to the field of computer supported collaborative work (CSCW).

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David Pescovitz
David Pescovitz (david@pesco.net) is co-editor of the popular weblog BoingBoing.net and a research director with the Institute for the Future. He is also editor-at-large for MAKE: and writer-in-residence for UC Berkeley's College of Engineering. Pescovitz co-wrote the book Reality Check, based on his long-running forecasting column in Wired magazine where he remains a correspondent. He also has contributed to Scientific American, Popular Science, the New York Times, the Washington Post, New Scientist, Business 2.0, and many other publications. In 2002, he won the Foresight Prize in Communication, recognizing excellence in educating the public and research community about nanotechnology and other emerging technologies. Pescovitz holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Electronic Media from the University of Cincinnati and a Master's in Journalism from UC Berkeley.

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Tim Pozar
Tim Pozar is a communications consulting engineer specializing in commercial microwave path engineering. Pozar is a co-founder of the Bay Area Wireless User Group. He has also dabbled in the Internet startup area, by co-founding a number of companies that are still around on their own or have been assimilated by other companies. Previous to this, for 25 years, he was a radio broadcast engineer.

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Bill Ralston
Bill Ralston, vice president of consulting and board member of SRIC-BI, manages SRIC-BI’s interdisciplinary consulting teams on strategy, innovation and technology management projects. He has been especially active in helping major corporations make new technology, product and business decisions using scenarios.

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Lisa Rein
Lisa Rein is co-founder of Creative Commons, an XML geek, Internet Archive volunteer, teacher, freelance journalist, videographer, media researcher and graduate student of San Francisco State University, Broadcast Electronic Communication Arts.

Rein teaches XML for UC Berkeley Extension Online, runs her own XML educational website called finetuning.com, and is editor of the XML.com Resource Guide.

Lisa has a video weblog, on lisa reins radar, a music website called lisa rein, and a ton of movies stored on the Internet Archive.

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Howard Rheingold
Rheingold is the author of Smart Mobs: The Next Social Revolution, which asserts that “Smart mobs emerge when communication and computing technologies amplify human talents for cooperation. The impacts of smart mob technology already appear to be both beneficial and destructive.” Rheingold discusses both the positive and negative aspects of mobile communication, pervasive computing, and collective action in his keynote address.

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Sam Ruby
Sam Ruby is a senior technical staff member in the Emerging Technologies group at IBM and is involved in a host of open source initiatives. He is a member of the board of directors and vice president of the Apache Software Foundation and a developer on the Apache Soap project. He is also the chairman of the Jakarta project.

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Martin Schwirn
Martin Schwirn specializes in high-tech consumer marketing and focuses on Internet and wireless applications from a consumer and user perspective. He monitors technological developments and discontinuities with potential impact on the business environment and follows best practices in consumer marketing for SRIC-BI’s Business Intelligence Program. Recently, Schwin has participated in several projects in which SRIC-BI explore future developments in Internet and wireless technologies and developed strategies for taking advantage of those changes. The projects comprised scenario planning, opportunity searches, future consumer needs exploration, brainstorming sessions, new product idea developments, and evaluation by consumers in focus groups. Before joining SRIC-BI, Schwirn worked as team manager in Germany for a telecommunications company in the service department for card applications and as an account executive at a Public Relations agency in San Francisco, California, with focus on high-tech and event marketing. He received his master of science in business administration degree in marketing from San Francisco

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John Scott
John Scott (employed at RadiantBlue Technologies) is the project leader of DOD’s Open Technology Development Initiative, which lays the groundwork for streamlined adoption of open source methodologies with DOD, which includes both the adoption (including testing) of private sector open source code and the formation of internal communities of interest around DOD systems, including classified systems. He has held senior positions in technology companies, including three start-ups, including management of software development teams and rapid ramp-up of consulting practices. John holds an MS in Systems Engineering from Virginia Tech and a BA in Mechanical Engineering from Lehigh University. He has been a repeat speaker at the O’Reilly Emerging Technology Conference (and served on the conference committee of its predecessor, Peer-to-Peer), and is a featured speaker at this year’s O’Reilly Open Source Conference.

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Doc Searls

Doc Searls is Senior Editor of Linux Journal, one of the world's leading technology monthlies, with a paid circulation of over 100,000. His monthly LJ column is Linux For Suits, and his newsletter is SuitWatch.

Doc is also co-author of The Cluetrain Manifesto: The End of Business as Usual, a New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Business Week, Borders Books and Amazon.com bestseller. (It was Amazon's #1 sales & marketing bestseller for over a year.)

Doc Searls Weblog is also one of the most familiar 'blogs' on the Web. J.D. Lasica of Annenberg's Online Journalism Review calls Doc "one of the deep thinkers in the blog movement."

In all three capacities, Doc is also a frequent speaker and panelist at industry conferences.

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Wendy Seltzer
Wendy Seltzer is a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation. A Fellow with Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, she founded and leads the Chilling Effects Clearinghouse. ChillingEffects.org collects and analyzes cease-and-desist notices sent to Internet users, and provides information to help these users understand their rights in response. She was also an adjunct professor at St. John's University School of Law this past fall, teaching Internet Law. Wendy is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Harvard College.

Seltzer outlines her point of view on the panel: "I've been a technology geek longer than I've been a lawyer, so it disturbs me when the blunt tool of the law gets in the way of cool new toys. I wanted to explore how copy controls affect media devices and user experiences by talking with people who have been designing, testing, and using the latest media tech.

"We're trying to cut through the hype about DRM. To some people, 'rights management' is the greatest thing since sliced bread; to others it's the devil incarnate. Do the two groups see eye-to-eye at any point? Are they even talking about the same 'DRM'? We'll look at where rights management is being used now, and to what effect. Lots of business models are built around delivery of locked-up audio and video content. Are these models more likely to add value or to alienate customers? Companies strike different balances trying to accomodate both rights managment and consumer demands -- which ones work?

"I hope technologists and content providers will come away from the presentation with ideas about how to serve their customers better, and that end-users will leave with clearer demands for and expectations from new technologies they use. As technology becomes deeply ingrained in our lives, we need to think hard about who controls our technology. Do our computers obey us or our software vendors; will our speakers lock us out at the behest of the record company? Technological innovation will come from those who focus on the needs of their customers first."

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David L. Sifry
David Sifry is a serial entrepreneur with over 19 years of software development and industry experience. Before founding Technorati, Sifry was cofounder and CTO of Sputnick, a Wi-Fi gateway company, and previously, cofounder of Linuxcare, where he served as CTO and VP of Engineering. Sifry also served as a founding member of the board of Linux International and on the technical advisory board of the National Cybercrime Training Partnership for law enforcement nctp.org.

He has a bachelor’s degree in computer science from Johns Hopkins University and can often be found speaking on panels and giving lectures on a variety of technology issues, ranging from wireless spectrum policy and Wi-Fi, to Weblogs and open source software.

Sifry’s blog is Sifry's Alerts.

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Craig Silverstein
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Marc Smith
Marc Smith is a research sociologist leading the Community Technologies Group at Microsoft Research, where he specializes in the social organization of online communities. He is the co-editor of Communities in Cyberspace (Routledge), a collection of essays exploring the ways identity, interaction, and social order develop in online groups. See: http://www.research.microsoft.com/~masmith and http://netscan.research.microsoft.com

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James Snell
James Snell is an architect, strategist and prototype engineer in the Emerging Technologies group at IBM where he focuses primarily on developing new web services technologies and implementation strategies. He is a contributor to the Apache Axis open source web services project, a member of the IBM Web Services Toolkit development team, the lead author of the O'Reilly book Programming Web Services with SOAP, and is a frequent contributor to IBM's developerWorks Web services zone.

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Sal Soghoian
Sal Soghoian is an AppleScript Product Manager, Worldwide Product Marketing for Apple. He is widely touted as "the" AppleScript Guru and driving force behind the continued expansion and acceptance of AppleScript. He began scripting in 1992, after discovering AppleScript could automate the publishing-related tasks at his service bureau. After spending years as an early "online evangelist," Sal continued to serve the AppleScript community as the AppleScript Product Manager at Apple. Throughout his tenure, AppleScript's importance, use, and integration has grown, becoming the indispensable tool for automation and communication on the Mac.

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Jeanette Stallons
Jeanette Stallons is a Senior Instructor in the Educational Services group at Macromedia. Stallons designs, develops, and teaches Macromedia training courses. She recently co-authored the Macromedia courses "Developing Rich Internet Applications with Macromedia Flash MX" and "Advanced ColdFusion MX Development."

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Damien Stolarz
Damien Stolarz is an entrepreneur with fifteen years of experience making computers talk to each other. He is the CEO of both Robotarmy Corp., a software/R&D consultancy, and Carbot, Inc. an in-car computer company. He authored "Mastering Internet Video" (Addison-Wesley, 2004). Stolarz holds a B.S. in Computer Science/Engineering from UCLA.

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Mark Sylvester
Mark is the Creative Director and Founder of Mixed Grill, developer of the Rich Internet Application, Intro™. He was the co-founder of Wavefront Technologies in 1984, one of the first commercial animation software developers. While at Wavefront, Mark helped develop The Advanced Visualizer, a 3D animation system first used at Universal Studios. In 1995 Wavefront merged with Silicon Graphics and Alias Research and he served as Ambassador for the new organization. At Alias|Wavefront, he was a part of the team that created Maya which is the software used by Industrial Light and Magic and the Academy Award winning Visual Effects films, Lord of the Rings. Maya was recently awarded an Oscar to add to two previously awarded Scientific and Technical Achievement Awards.

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David Temkin
David Temkin is the chief technology officer of Laszlo Systems. In this role, he has positioned the company to become the next technology standard for rich internet applications. Under his direction, Laszlo developed its patent-pending open-source product suite and extended operations to both coasts of the United States. Before founding Laszlo, Temkin was senior director of Engineering at Excite@Home where he led a team of 55 engineers, designers, and technical writers responsible for developing the company's consumer software. Prior to Excite@Home, Temkin was an engineering manager in the Newton division at Apple Computer and developed enterprise software at EDS. He graduated from Brown University with a double major in computer science and history, and is named on four software patents.

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Jorgen Thelin
Jørgen Thelin is the Chief Scientist at Cape Clear Software Inc, where he focuses on Web Services technology and standards. Previously, he worked on major Java projects for Reuters, J.P.Morgan, and BSkyB. At Orbware he designed and built the Orcas EJB server. He has a CS degree from Stirling University, Scotland, and an MBA from Warwick Business School, England. A Java programmer since 1996, he is a Sun Certified Java Programmer, Developer, and Architect.

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James Till
During the past fifteen years, James Till has established a career leading technology start-ups both within Fortune 500 corporations and in venture capital funded settings. Most recently, as Senior Vice President of Sales & Marketing at SkyDesk, Till helped reposition the company as a leading provider of internet data storage and protection services to the small-medium size business marketplace. While at SkyDesk, Till helped the company raise over $50 million in funding and secure exclusive distribution agreements with Dell, Gateway, IBM, and Intuit. Prior to SkyDesk, Till established Macmillan Publishing's mass market distribution division in the US and Canada, creating over a $100 million revenue multimedia division in two years. Till has also lead the sales and marketing efforts at three computer technology companies, including Paragraph International, Compton's New Media, and StarPress Multimedia.

Till has been presenting the benefits of Internet File Management to audiences nationwide at industry events produced by Educause and AIIM. He holds a B.S. in Marketing from Northeastern University and is an active participant in AIIM, the San Diego Internet Marketing Council, the Software Publishers Association, and related industry forums.

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Fred von Lohmann
Fred von Lohmann is a senior staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, specializing in intellectual property issues. In that role, he has represented programmers, technology innovators, and individuals in litigation against every major record label, movie studio, and television network (as well as several cable TV networks and music publishers) in the United States. In additon to litigation, he is involved in EFF's efforts to educate policy-makers regarding the proper balance between intellectual property protection and the public interest in fair use, free expression, and innovation.

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Kymberlee Weil
Kymberlee is the Chief Operating Officer for Mixed Grill, developer of the Rich Internet Application, Intro™ . In addition to her work at Mixed Grill, she is the Conference Director for Flashforward, the nation’s preeminent conference for designers and developers of Flash Applications. Kymberlee is the author of two hands-on training books that focus on Macromedia’s Flash software. She is a nationally recognized speaker in the New Media industry, presenting at national and international conferences and leading Universities. She has been involved in the creation and implementation of web-enabled solutions and project management, combining technical expertise with business process methodology. Kymberlee has her MBA from Pepperdine University.

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Raymond Yee
Raymond Yee is the Technology Architect at UC Berkeley for the Interactive University (IU), a project to make resources of the university available to K-12 through the Internet. While earning a Ph.D. in biophysics, Raymond taught philosophy and computer science to K-11 students in the Academic Talent Development Program on the Berkeley campus.

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Ethan Zuckerman
Ethan Zuckerman is Founder and Chief Technologist of Geekcorps, a non-profit technology volunteer corps. Founded in 2000, Geekcorps pairs skilled volunteers from U.S. and European high tech companies with businesses in emerging nations for one to four-month volunteer tours. Volunteers are currently serving in Ghana, Armenia, Mongolia, and Rwanda and serves in over a dozen nations in 2003. Geekcorps became a division of the International Executive Service Corps in 2001, where Zuckerman now serves as Vice President of the Geekcorps Division.

In 2003, he became a fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard Law School. His research at Berkman focuses on linkages between the Open Source software community and the international development community and on the economics of IT for development.

Prior to founding Geekcorps, Zuckerman helped found Tripod, an early pioneer in the web community space. He served as Tripod's first graphic designer and technologist, and later as VP of Business Development and VP of Research and Development. After Tripod's acquisition by Lycos in 1998, he served as General Manager of the Angelfire.com division and as a member of the Lycos mergers and acquisitions team.

He was given the 2002 Technology in Service of Humanity Award by MIT's Technology Review Magazine and named to the TR100, TR's list of innovators under the age of 35. Recently, Ethan was named a Global Leader for Tomorrow by the World Economic Forum. He is a frequent speaker on digital divide and appropriate technology issues.

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