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Speakers

One of the best reasons to attend the O'Reilly Mac OS X Conference is the unprecedented gathering of top-notch presenters, leaders, and experts. Core developers, unique users, and visionaries share their knowledge with you to help you solve your computing or programming challenges. You won't find a gathering like this at any other conference.

Our speaker list is growing daily. Please check back regularly to see who we have lined up for you.

Chris Adamson
Chris Adamson is the Associate Online Editor for O'Reilly's Java sites ONJava and java.net, is a community manager for java.net's Mac community, and is the author of O'Reilly's upcoming QuickTime for Java: A Developer's Notebook. He also consults on Java Media projects, in the form of his Atlanta-based consulting company Subsequently and Furthermore, Inc.

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Scott Anguish
As a senior technical writer for Apple's Cocoa & Developer Tools group, Scott Anguish is responsible for creating and updating documentation for Apple's Cocoa APIs. Anguish joined Apple's Technical Publications department after co-writing Cocoa Programming, for SAMS. In 1994, he created Stepwise.com, a portal related to NeXT technologies. Today Stepwise serves as a community clearinghouse for the Mac OS X technology platform, as well as Cocoa and WebObjects development articles. Anguish started developing for the Macintosh in 1984. Upon seeing NeXTStep in 1992 he was hooked on the possibilities of a unified imaging model and a pure object-oriented system.

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Matthew Barger
Matthew Barger is a web application developer for Montgomery County Public Schools, one of the largest public school systems in the United States. Recently, he designed and developed the DAE System, a metadata repository that facilitates ten thousand teachers and media specialists in the evaluation of instructional materials.

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Michael Bartosh
Michael Bartosh is President of 4am Media, Inc. A former Systems Engineer with Apple, he now provides technology training and consulting centering around Apple and Mac OS X. Bartosh specialized in cross platform directory services integration, enterprise infrastructures, and client management. He is an Apple Authorized Trainer and his company, 4am Media, Inc., is an Apple Professional Services provider and member of the Apple Consultants Network.

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Robb Beal
Robb Beal is President of UserCreations, LLC and creator of Spring, an innovative, web-inspired desktop where you interact naturally with singular, visual representations of the people, places, products, etc. that define your life.

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Gabriel Benveniste
Gabe Benveniste is a Mac OS X system administrator at Pixar Animation Studios. He comes from a traditional Mac Admin position and focuses on streamlining the administration of Mac OS X machines specifically and other sysadmin tasks in general.

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Bill Bumgarner
Bill Bumgarner is the Manager of Database Access Tools at Apple. Prior to joining Apple, Bill was a founder and principal in CodeFab, a company specializing in the construction of custom software solutions for small companies through to major corporations.

The PyObjC project was started in 1994 and Bumgarner has contributed to the project--along with many other open source projects--over the last eight years.

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Brook Conner
Brook Conner is an author, freelance consultant, and faculty member at NYU. His next book is "Programming Quartz: Advanced 2D Graphics on the Macintosh," forthcoming from O'Reilly. His research papers appear in a number of venues, including ACM SIGGRAPH. In the past, he worked as Director of Product Development at Novix Media, Manager of Technology Assessment at Sony, and Assistant Director of the NSF Science and Technology Center for Computer Graphics and Scientific Visualization. He also consulted with numerous companies, including Microsoft Research, IBM, Motorola, Mitre, Fraunhofer CRCG, the Providence Journal, and Dynamic Diagrams.

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mmalcolm Crawford
Malcolm Crawford works in Apple's Technical Publications Group. Prior to joining Apple, Malcolm was an Apple Certified Trainer, teaching WebObjects and Cocoa Development classes. He was a founder and principal in Cassini Division, a company specialising in content management systems, and in the construction of custom software solutions for small companies through to major corporations. He is also a contributing editor to the Stepwise website.

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James Duncan Davidson
James Duncan Davidson is a freelance author, software developer, and consultant focusing on Mac OS X and related technologies. He is the author of Running Mac OS X Panther, the coauthor of Mac OS X Panther Hacks (with Rael Dornfest) , the coauthor of Learning Cocoa with Objective-C (with Apple Computer, Inc.), and the coauthor of Cocoa in a Nutshell (with Michael Beam), all published by OReilly Media, as well as publisher of his own web site, x180

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Brian Dichter
Brian Dichter is a technical systems supervisor within a large high school district in the Chicago-area. He has tamed Macs, tackled *NIX systems and dabbled with various internet technologies. In addition to maintaining servers, networks, desktops, and other technical systems, he spends time thinking up neat ways for teachers and students to benefit from technology. In his spare time Dichter works with digital audio, reads sci-fi and philosophy, and hangs out with his wife and two cats.

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Rael Dornfest
Rael Dornfest is Founder and CEO of Portland, Oregon-based Values of n. Rael leads the Values of n charge with passion, unearthly creativity, and a repertoire of puns and jokes — some of which are actually good. Prior to founding Values of n, he was O'Reilly's Chief Technical Officer, program chair for the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, series editor of the bestselling Hacks book series, and instigator of O'Reilly's Rough Cuts early access program. He built Meerkat, the first web-based feed aggregator, was champion and co-author of the RSS 1.0 specification, and has written and contributed to six O'Reilly books. Rael's programmatic pride and joy is the nimble, open source blogging application Blosxom, the principles of which you'll find in the Values of n philosophy and embodied in Stikkit: Little yellow notes that think.

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Andrew M. Duncan
Andrew M. Duncan started programming in FORTRAN on Control Data 6600 hardware in 1974, and a quarter century later progressed to Mac OS X. He holds a Bachelor's degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology, and a Masters in mathematics from the University of California at Santa Cruz. He is now on leave from doctoral work on compilers at UC Santa Barbara. He currently works at Expertcity, designing the core class libraries.

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Matisse Enzer
Matisse Enzer is the author of "Unix for Mac OS X" (Peachpit Press, December 2002). Enzer has been helping people build all manner of things since the mid-1970s as a game designer, political organizer, union carpenter, architecture student, general building contractor, customer support manager at The WELL, and since 1994, as an Internet consultant. His web site is www.matisse.net. Enzer lives in San Francisco, California and Black Rock City, Nevada.

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Dan Frakes
Dan Frakes is a technology writer, shareware developer, consultant, and long-time Mac user. He is the author of Mac OS X Power Tools, a frequent contributor to Macworld magazine's "Mac OS X Secrets" column and the TidBITS newsletter, contributed to Mac OS X Disaster Relief by Ted Landau, and is an editor/author of the upcoming Mac Bible, 9th Edition. He is also the creator of InformINIT, the award-winning shareware guide to the Classic Mac OS, and a "ListMom" for some of the largest Mac-related mailing lists on the 'Net. Frakes has worked as a programmer/analyst supporting Macs at a major university and as an analyst at a research and consulting firm where his projects included the evaluation of educational technology policy. He is a frequent speaker at Mac-related conferences, and is a ten-time Macworld Expo Conference Faculty.

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Bob Fraser
Bob Fraser is the Java Product Manager, Worldwide Product Marketing for Apple. He first fell in love with rapid application development systems on his Symbolics lisp machine and continues to dabble today with WebObjects. In past lives, he has had practical experience as a software engineer, systems designer, and consultant.

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Terry Gaasterland
Terry Gaasterland, an associate professor, joined The Rockefeller University in September 1998 to establish the Laboratory of Computational Genomics. A computer scientist with a long-standing interest in medical and biological questions, Dr. Gaasterland designs bioinformatics tools for interpreting the flood of data being generated by the Human Genome Project and other sequencing efforts. Because she focuses intensively on microbial genomes, her work also has important implications for the understanding and control of infectious diseases.

Dr. Gaasterland was a postdoctoral fellow in Computer Science at the Department of Energy when the first microbial genomes were funded for sequencing by the DOE. Recognizing that genome interpretation would be an intensive computational task that involves AI, databases and distributed computing -- her area of expertise in computer science -- Dr. Gaasterland created a microbial genome annotation system called MAGPIE for Multipurpose Automated Genome Project Investigation Environment. A widely available computational tool, MAGPIE and its newer eukaryotic adaptation, EGRET, allow biomedical researchers to gain a deeper understanding of a particular genome sequence by rapidly comparing it to what is known about the available genome sequences of other organisms. This comparative approach to genomics links human cellular processes to those in model organisms at the molecular level. Comparing not only genes and proteins but their regulatory patterns and usage patterns helps to identify drug targets for diseases, improves understanding of genes associated with human disease, and gives deeper insight into the evolution of biochemical pathways.

Dr. Gaasterland earned a B.S. in computer science and Russian from Duke University in 1984. She continued her studies in computer science at the University of Maryland, where she received an M.S. in 1988 and a Ph.D. in 1992. From 1992 to 1998, she was a member of the mathematics and computer science division at Argonne National Laboratory, first as an Enrico Fermi Scholar, and then as an assistant scientist. From 1995 to 1998, she also held an appointment as an assistant professor at the University of Chicago.

A founding officer of the International Society for Computational Biology, Dr. Gaasterland was named a Sinsheimer Scholar in 1999. In October 2000, she received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers -- the United States government's most prestigious honor for young investigators.

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Doug Hanley
Doug is a member of the Apple Consultants Network Advisory Council. He founded VMUG, the Las Vegas Macintosh Users Group. He teaches Macintosh Troubleshooting & Maintenance at the Community College of Southern Nevada and is certified as an Area Certified Technical Coordinator who has been supporting Mac users for over 13 years. He is also the Mac Corespondent on the Computer Outlook, a syndicate radio talk show.

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Bethany Jane Hanson
Bethany Jane Hanson is a Mac OS X system administrator at Pixar Animation Studios. Hanson comes from a traditional Unix Admin position, but has worked with Mac OS X for the past two years as part of Pixar's Mac Admin team. She's enjoyed being a bridge between the two worlds, introducing Unix automation/ease of administration to the Macintosh where applicable.

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Andy Ihnatko
Andy Ihnatko describes himself as America's 42nd Most-Beloved Industry Figure, because "It's vaguely credible-sounding but impossible to really prove or disprove, and thus is exactly the sort of tag I'd been looking for."

A regular columnist for Macintosh magazines for over a decade (and currently Macworld's opinion columnist), Andy has been named to the Power 25 list of the Macintosh industry's most influential people every year since the list's inception, and has written two books. He has also contributed to "Playboy," "Yahoo! Internet Life" and "too many online publications to rationally count." His writings have been incorporated into college curriculum and been licensed by NASA.

Though proud of the above accomplishments, Ihnatko is nonetheless resigned to the fact that he'll probably be best-known for creating "The Original MacQuarium," a 50-page book of plans and instructions for converting any Classic-style Macintosh into a functional 2.5-gallon aquarium. Published in 1993 as one of the Internet's first e-Books, it's provided Ihnatko with a steady stream of emails from new and happy MacQuarium builders.

Ihnatko is The Chicago Sun-Times' technology columnist. He lives in Boston with his two goldfish, Click and Drag. His website (and well-thumbed blog) can be found at www.andyi.com.

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Will Iverson
Will Iverson is the author of the recently published O’Reilly book Mac OS X for Java Geeks. He previously served as Developer Relations Manager for the VisualCafé group at Symantec and as the Java & Runtimes Product Manager at Apple Computer. He has led Cascade Technology Group, a private consulting firm, since 1999. He has spoken at a variety of technical conferences including JavaOne, Macworld, ComDex, MacHack, and many more.

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Stan Jirman
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Will Jorgensen
Will Jorgensen is the Macintosh expert at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He is the primary contact for Macintosh support at the PNNL. Jorgensen has created a number of utilities in AppleScript and AppleScript Studio to ease various administration tasks. In addition to a custom Mac OS X setup program, these utilities have automated the creation of webpages, given users an interface to network installers, and eased the conversion and exchange of files between Macintosh and Windows systems. Currently, Jorgensen is working on setting up a Mac OS X Server to provide single sign on solution to the Macintosh users at PNNL.

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Steve Kalkwarf
Twelve years of technology management in a school district convinced Steve that he'd rather work in the private sector. Five years at Apple convinced him that working for a smaller company had to be better. He has been happily employed at Bare Bones Software, ever since.

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John Ko
John Ko founded Cincro in 1996 looking for convergence between supercomputing, visualization, and real-time data collaboration. Over the past five years, Ko has designed and helped to develop this convergence, called Zanvas (Zoomable Canvas). Ko began his career in 1984 working on CRAY supercomputers and SGI workstations. He has a B.S. from Northwestern University.

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Brad Koester
Koester has a background in web programming and development dating back to early 1995. For three years, he was head of technical services and lead project manager and sys admin for cdstreet.com, the independent music portal. Koester is currently a member of the three-person IT/Web team 605 Network in Austin, TX, and has been studying QuickTime Streaming Server for the last three years. Through the newly formed non-profit Opencast, founder David Glassco and Koester have worked closely with Damien Stolarz of Robatarmy in Los Angeles to pioneer an efficient way for non-profits to utilize QuickTime Streaming Server to deliver content via a shared bandwidth network. Koester holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Civil Engineering, though took on web technology as a career. His specialties are network administration, IT networks and firewalls, web back-end programming and design, and numerous other interests. Koester is on the Advisory Board of the Austin Music Network, a volunteer for the Austin Film Society, founder of austinactors.net, and an avid hobbyist of all things Mac and PC related.

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Gordon Meyer
Gordon Meyer is a a software engineer, ethnographer, and author. His house in Silicon Valley is fully automated and controlled by a talking computer that wakes his family in the morning, keeps an eye on the dog during the day, and alerts him to missed phone calls and package deliveries.

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Tim Monroe
Tim Monroe is a senior software engineer in the QuickTime engineering group at Apple Computer. Prior to that, he worked in the technical publications group at Apple, where he authored a number of the Inside Macintosh books. In the QuickTime group, he's worked on interactive media, Flash, sample applications, QuickTime Cocoa frameworks, and other fun stuff. In his spare time, he writes a monthly column for MacTech magazine on QuickTime programming. He is also the auhor of two recent books, QuickTime Toolkit, Volume One: Basic Movie Playback and Media Types, and QuickTime Toolkit, Volume Two: Advanced Movie Playback and Media Types (Morgan-Kaufmann, 2004).

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Matt Neuburg
Matt Neuburg is the author of O'Reilly's REALbasic: The Definitive Guide. He has been making computers do the work for him since 1968.

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Scott Nichol
Scott Nichol is an independent Mac developer and the author of the shareware application f(x). He also maintains the macmethod.com website. At his real job, Scott is a software engineer specializing in high-precision robotics and automation software for microchip assembly.

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Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly is founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. In addition to publishing pioneering books like Ed Krol's The Whole Internet User's Guide & Catalog (selected by the New York Public Library as one of the most significant books of the twentieth century), O'Reilly has also been a pioneer in the popularization of the Internet. O'Reilly's Global Network Navigator site (GNN, which was sold to America Online in September 1995) was the first Web portal and the first true commercial site on the World Wide Web.

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Steve Olson
Steve is a Technical Director for Sybase. He has been working as a system engineer with database and on-line transaction processing systems for his entire 25-year career, and has spent the past 15 years with the Sybase Enterprise Systems Division. His current role is that of principal architect for the Sybase Enterprise Systems product group. Most recently, Steve and his team have brought the Sybase enterprise database management system, Adaptive Server Enterprise, to Mac OS X, and is now putting the finishing touches on the Panther edition of this product.

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Ed Peterlin
Edward Peterlin is the lead Macintosh developer at BIOPAC Systems, Inc. by day and an OpenOffice.org community contributor by night. A graduate of Princeton University with an engineering degree in Computer Science, he has worked on a variety of large Unix, Macintosh, and Win32 projects, specializing in user interfaces and cross porting. He is currently helping to organize the community effort for completing the OpenOffice.org 1.0 port for MacOS X.

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David Pogue
David Pogue is the weekly technology columnist for the New York Times. He is also the #1 best-selling Macintosh author, having authored "Mac OS X: The Missing Manual" and several other titles in the Missing Manual series, which he created.

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James Reynolds
James Reynolds is a member of the University of Utah's Student Computing Labs Mac Group. His main duty is the deployment of Mac OS X. Most of his responsibilities include the OS customizations, scripts, and security of the Mac OS X lab and kiosk computers supported by SCL.

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Scott Richert
Scott P. Richert is the executive editor of Chronicles: A Magazine of American Culture, a 52-page monthly produced entirely in Mac OS X. He has worked with Macs in publishing since 1989. He is currently overseeing the final stages of migrating the magazine and Chronicles Press's book projects to Adobe InDesign from QuarkXPress.

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Philip Rinehart
Philip Rinehart, support specialist at Yale University, has been using Macintosh Computers since the days of the Macintosh SE and Mac OS X since its Developer Preview Release. Currently, he is coordinating the effort of Macintosh OS X migration. Before coming to Yale, he worked as a Unix system administrator for a dot-com company.

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Edward Savio
Edward Savio is FastMac's Product and Marketing Manager.

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Rod Schmidt
Rod Schmidt is a software developer in Salt Lake City, Utah. He has been an Apple fan since the Apple II, and with the release of Mac OS X, has made it his preferred OS. Schmidt is also a fan of NextSTEP and with Mac OS X's heritage, the opportunity to develop with Cocoa could not be resisted. Schmidt is also interested in different languages and fell in love with Ruby in 2000. Schmidt started infiniteNIL Software in 2002 to write software for Mac OS X.

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Dan Shoop
Dan Shoop has been managing systems and networks for over twenty years, initially focusing on large scale systems and high availability clusters. Working on nascent networks in the early '80's that would become today's Internet, his focus naturally shifted along that path. As an internet architect, he's worked both nationally and internationally bringing companies like outdoor retailer Campmor into e-commerce, directing internet technologies for publishing and content providers like Sesame Street and Parade Magazine, and designing systems and networks for nationwide ISPs, hosting companies, and Wall Street. Shoop's work has been covered in the New York Times, by the Harvard Business School, and "The Computer Chronicles." Having fell in love with the Mac in the early '90's as a personal platform he's very pleased that it's now a level player in the server world where his expertise is finding new synergies for Mac users.

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Cliff Skolnick
Cliff Skolnick is an active participant in the community networks movement and a founding member of both the Bay Area Wireless User Group (BAWUG) and FreeNetworks.org.

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Dori Smith
Dori Smith is co-author of Mac OS X Unwired and JavaScript for the WWW: Visual QuickStart Guide, 5th Edition, author of Java 2 for the WWW: Visual QuickStart Guide, and a contributor to numerous online and print magazines. She is on the Steering Committee for the Web Standards Project, and is Publisher and ListMom for the Wise-Women's Web organization.

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Sal Soghoian
Sal Soghoian is an AppleScript Product Manager, Worldwide Product Marketing for Apple. He is widely touted as "the" AppleScript Guru and driving force behind the continued expansion and acceptance of AppleScript. He began scripting in 1992, after discovering AppleScript could automate the publishing-related tasks at his service bureau. After spending years as an early "online evangelist," Sal continued to serve the AppleScript community as the AppleScript Product Manager at Apple. Throughout his tenure, AppleScript's importance, use, and integration has grown, becoming the indispensable tool for automation and communication on the Mac.

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Daniel Steinberg
Daniel Steinberg is the editor-in-chief of O'Reilly Media's Java publications java.net and ONJava.com.

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Kristoffer Steinhoff
Kristoffer Steinhoff is the System Administrator with the USITE Computing Clusters at the University of Chicago. He started working with USITE after graduating from the U of C.

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Ted Stevko
Ted Stevko has been a network administrator, a graphic designer, a programmer, a cartoonist and an illustrator, usually all at once. Currently working as a Java developer using J2EE web services to develop high-availabilty websites, he's wrangled with graphics and programming problems for the last seven years, both from a development point of view and a technical point of view. Frequently, you can find him working on new ideas, including a frighteningly thought-out concept for object-oriented LOGO.

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Damien Stolarz
Damien Stolarz is an entrepreneur with fifteen years of experience making computers talk to each other. He is the CEO of both Robotarmy Corp., a software/R&D consultancy, and Carbot, Inc. an in-car computer company. He authored "Mastering Internet Video" (Addison-Wesley, 2004). Stolarz holds a B.S. in Computer Science/Engineering from UCLA.

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Guy (Bud) Tribble, M.D.-Ph.D.
Dr. Tribble's role at Apple is to help set the long term technical direction for the Mac OS software engineering group. Prior to his current role at Apple he was Vice President of Engineering at Eazel Inc., which developed next generation user interface software and Internet services designed to make Linux based computers easier to use.

Dr. Tribble is one of the industry's noted experts in object oriented programming and user interface design. Prior to joining Eazel he was VP and Chief Technology Officer for the Sun-Netscape Alliance, responsible for guiding Internet and e-commerce software R&D. He held several VP level positions at Sun over seven years. Dr. Tribble began his career at Apple Computer where in 1981 he was manager of the original Macintosh Software team, helping to design the MacOS and user interface. In 1985, he helped found NeXT Computer, where he was Vice President of Software Engineering and a key architect of the NextStep operating system, a groundbreaking software environment.

Dr. Tribble earned a B.A. degree in Physics at the University of California, San Diego and a M.D. and Ph.D. in Biophysics and Physiology at the University of Washington, Seattle.

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Srinidhi Varadarajan, Ph.D.
Dr. Srinidhi Varadarajan is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Virginia Tech. He was honored with the NSF Career Award in 2002 for "Weaving a Code Tapestry: A Compiler Directed Framework for Scalable Network Emulation." He has focused his research on building a distributed network emulation system that can scale to emulate hundreds of thousands of virtual nodes.

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Dan Wood
Dan Wood is the president of Karelia Software, LLC. He is the creator of Watson, a popular Mac OS X software program that accesses a variety of web services. Wood is also the creator of CURLHandle, an open source Cocoa framework that is used for transport by a number of other Mac OS X applications, including Spring, Aizai, Konfabulator, and iConquer 2. He is hard at work on his next software product.

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