O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference 2005
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Speakers

One of the best reasons to attend the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference is the unprecedented gathering of top-notch presenters, leaders, and experts. Core developers, unique users, and visionaries share their knowledge with you to help you solve your computing or programming challenges. You won't find a gathering like this at any other conference.

Rodney Aiglstorfer
Rodney Aiglstorfer has been designing and developing internet-centric consumer solutions for U.S. and Japanese companies for over a decade. As the co-founder and CTO of mfoundry, Rodney is the principal architect and technical visionary behind the mWorks platform. mWorks will help realize mfoundry's vision of helping companies leverage the power of mobile devices. Prior to mfoundry, Rodney was National Director of Technology for Semaphore Partners, one of the largest interactive agencies in the U.S. As such, he provided strategic technical leadership and managed engineering departments across three geographies (San Francisco, Chicago, and New York). During his tenure, Rodney helped deliver solutions for Orbitz.com, LeapFrog, RestaurantPro, Screen Actors Guild, Behr, and BEA. Rodney also worked for Andersen Consulting (now Accenture) in their advanced solutions group where he specialized in Java-based Web-Centric Enterprise Architectures. Rodney began his professional career in Japan, working for a number of companies in electronic gaming and e-business solutions.

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Chris Anderson
Chris Anderson is Editor-in-Chief of Wired magazine, a position he took in 2001. Since then he has led the magazine to five National Magazine Award nominations, winning the prestigious top prize for General Excellence in 2005, a year in which he was also named Editor of the Year by Advertising Age magazine. He is the author of New York Times bestselling book The Long Tail: Why the Future of Business is Selling Less of More, which was published in 2006, and runs a blog on the subject at www.thelongtail.com.

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Bert Bates
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Gavin Bell
Gavin designs social software applications for Nature Publishing Group. Driving better engagement with and for readers by means of good interaction design and psychology means understanding what content is published and the relationship we want our readers to have with it. Gavin lives in London and writes on take one onion and nascent.

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Erik Benson
Erik Benson (http://erikbenson.com) is the Chief Janitorial Officer and one of the founders of the Robot Co-op, based in Seattle. With six other robots, he has helped create 43 Things (http://43things.com), a social networking site that encourages people to list the things they'd like to do with their life, find people who can help achieve them, and share progress as they go. He is also the creator of All Consuming, a site that determines which books are most popular in the weblog community, and author of a book titled "Man Versus Himself".

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Jeffrey P. Bezos
Jeff Bezos has always been interested in anything that can be revolutionized by computers. Intrigued by the amazing growth in use of the Internet, Bezos created a business model that leveraged the Internet’s unique ability to deliver huge amounts of information rapidly and efficiently.

In 1994 he founded Amazon.com, Inc., now the leading online retailer, offering services that traditional retailers cannot: lower prices, authoritative selection and a wealth of product information.

Before heading west to start Amazon.com, Bezos worked at the intersection of computer science and finance, helping build one of the most technically sophisticated quantitative hedge funds on Wall Street for D.E. Shaw & Co. He also led the development of computer systems that helped manage more than $250 billion in assets for Bankers Trust Company.

He graduated summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa in electrical engineering and computer science from Princeton University in 1986.

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Matt Biddulph
Matt Biddulph works for the Technology and Design team of BBC Radio and Music Interactive, utilizing digital radio, interactive television, the Web, and mobile platforms to extend the corporation's ten national music and speech-based radio stations.

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Jon Bostrom
Jon Bostrom has over twenty-three years of systems experience, including designing and implementing large-scale, object-oriented, distributed applications. He currently serves as senior director of Java in Technology Platforms for Nokia. Bostrom is responsible for defining and driving the vision and architecture for the mobile end-to-end Java environment. Bostrom has focused on defining the technology and creating the partnerships that will foster the next generation of Java-enabled mobile devices.

Bostrom joined Nokia in 2003 as the chief java architect in Nokia Mobile Software. Prior to joining Nokia, Bostrom was chief architect and a key driver of Sun’s Mobility Technology Solutions group, working to define the end-to-end architecture for Java technology solutions in 2.5 and 3G environments. Bostrom was the Sun lead architect for SprintPCS Vision and the lead architect for DoCoMo i-Mode Java. He was the lead designer for Java software provisioning for wireless and the creator of the “Java Service Vending Machine” concept. Bostrom has advised most of the top manufacturers and operators around the world on wireless data services. Bostrom is also one of the original members of the JiniTM technology team and was instrumental in the Jini technology launch and formation of the Jini technology community effort. During his time with Sun, Bostrom won two Chairman’s awards for technology innovation and filed patents in Java mobile security, interface design, and content handling. He has also been a key contributor to Java One and has spoken as the keynote at many software events across the world.

In addition, Bostrom was with the original team at Hewlett-Packard that designed the first laser printer. Subsequently, he worked on the Smalltalk CORBA binding and was the consulting architect for Distributed Smalltalk. Bostrom was director of Distributed Object Systems at ParcPlaceDigitalk and managed U.S. and Asia-Pacific consulting for GemStone.

Bostrom is on the board of directors of the Open Services Getaway Initiative (OSGi), co-leads the Mobile Expert Group and is co-spec lead for JSR 232 (the Java Community Process Program).

Bostrom attended UASF School of Aerospace Science and Boise State University.

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Stewart Butterfield
Stewart Butterfield is a director of product management at Yahoo! where he oversees the development of Flickr.com. He also co-founded and acted as CEO of Flickr's parent company, Ludicorp, before its acquisition by Yahoo! in the spring of 2005.

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Justin F. Chapweske
Justin Chapweske is the Founder and CEO of Onion Networks, Inc., a company based in Minneapolis, Minnesota that provides file transfer acceleration and network infrastructure software for enterprise applications. Justin is the original inventor of Swarmcast, the first ever "swarming" content delivery network and more recently has unveiled "swarmstreaming", a new swarming technology that allows smooth progressive playback of video and skipping ahead without downloading the entire file.

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Tom Coates
Tom Coates is a leading social software practitioner and early weblogger interested in the shape of the web to come and how to make neat stuff that thrives in it. He's just started looking after a London splinter cell of Yahoo's Tech Development group after two years of running a small R&D team for the BBC exploring future media navigation, annotation and distribution. He's also worked for many of the UKs most prominent web companies including Time Out and UpMyStreet where he developed the geo-coded community UpMyStreet Conversations. He writes a bunch of stuff at plasticbag.org and looks after an experimental online community at barbelith.com.

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Dennis Crowley

Dennis Crowley is the Director of Product Development at area/code. He was the founder of dodgeball.com, a New York-based service which aims to coordinate social interactions between mobile users. His work focuses on finding the intersection between location-based services, social software and user-generated content on mobile devices.

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Roger Dingledine
Roger Dingledine is a security and privacy researcher. While at MIT, he developed Free Haven, one of the early peer-to-peer systems that emphasized resource management while retaining anonymity for its users. He consults for government and industry to design and develop systems for anonymity and traffic analysis resistance. Recent work includes anonymous publishing and communication systems, traffic analysis resistance, censorship resistance, attack resistance for decentralized networks, and reputation.

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Pavni Diwanji
Pavni Diwanji, chairman and founder of MailFrontier, is a well-known email and software technology innovator and industry presenter. Prior to founding MailFrontier, she managed the subscriber products division for Excite@Home, supporting four million subscribers. Diwanji is also known for the invention of servlets during her tenure with Sun Microsystems.

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Cory Doctorow
Cory Doctorow (craphound.com) is a science fiction novelist, blogger and technology activist. He is the co-editor of the popular weblog Boing Boing (boingboing.net), and a contributor to Wired, Popular Science, Make, the New York Times, and many other newspapers, magazines and websites. He was formerly Director of European Affairs for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (eff.org), a non-profit civil liberties group that defends freedom in technology law, policy, standards and treaties. Presently, he serves as the Fulbright Chair at the Annenberg Center for Public Diplomacy at the University of Southern California.

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Rael Dornfest
Rael Dornfest is Founder and CEO of Portland, Oregon-based Values of n. Rael leads the Values of n charge with passion, unearthly creativity, and a repertoire of puns and jokes — some of which are actually good. Prior to founding Values of n, he was O'Reilly's Chief Technical Officer, program chair for the O'Reilly Emerging Technology Conference, series editor of the bestselling Hacks book series, and instigator of O'Reilly's Rough Cuts early access program. He built Meerkat, the first web-based feed aggregator, was champion and co-author of the RSS 1.0 specification, and has written and contributed to six O'Reilly books. Rael's programmatic pride and joy is the nimble, open source blogging application Blosxom, the principles of which you'll find in the Values of n philosophy and embodied in Stikkit: Little yellow notes that think.

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George Dyson
George Dyson is a boat designer, writer, and historian of technology whose interests have ranged from the development and redevelopment of the Aleut kayak (Baidarka, 1986) to the evolution of digital computing and telecommunications (Darwin Among the Machines, 1997) and, most recently, nuclear bomb-propelled space exploration (Project Orion, 2002).

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Drew Endy
Drew Endy studied civil, environmental, and biochemical engineering at Lehigh University and Thayer School, Dartmouth College. From 1998 through 2001 he helped to start the Molecular Sciences Institute, an independent not-for-profit biological research lab in Berkeley, CA. In 2002, he started a group as a fellow in the Department of Biology and the Biological Engineering Division at MIT; he joined the MIT faculty in 2004. Endy co-founded the MIT Synthetic Biology working group and the Registry of Standard Biological Parts, and organized the First International Conference on Synthetic Biology. Endy and colleagues taught the 2003 and 2004 MIT Synthetic Biology labs and organized the 2004 Synthetic Biology competition, a five-school course that enabled students to work together to design and build engineered biological systems. Endy's research focuses on the engineering of many-component integrated biological systems and the design of reproducing machines.

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Phil Fawcett
Mr. Phil Fawcett, has worked in the computer science industry since the early 1980s. As a corporate Controller/Accountant turned IT manager, he planned and implemented manual-to-automated system conversions for small-to-medium sized businesses in fields of manufacturing, land and building management, and large scale construction projects.    Since coming to Microsoft in 1984 Mr. Fawcett has held positions as a Customer Support Engineer, Test Lead and Test Manager and was involved in more than 20 product ships for versions of Word, Excel, Works, and Project for the Apple and Windows operating systems. He also held positions as a Supportability Program Manager, Technical Evangelist for Windows Hardware Platforms, Regional Call Center Manager, and currently is a Senior Program Manager focusing on transferring technology for 700+ researchers worldwide into the Microsoft Windows product division.     Mr. Fawcett holds a BA degree in Accounting/ Marketing from Seattle Pacific University, an MBA from Seattle University, and is a PhD candidate in Human and Organizational Development at the Fielding Graduate Institute in Santa Barbra.  He current holds six patents in modem and communication-related technology focused mostly on the Windows product line.  His hobbies are technology, photography, motocross riding, painting, and long distance bicycle riding (he has participated in three transcontinental bicycle rides, which covered the width and breadth of the United States in 21 days or less).  

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Lee Felsenstein
Lee has been designing electronic products for over 35 years and has created several pioneering designs in the personal computer industry. He has won awards from the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Tech Museum of Innovation for his groundbreaking work in several fields. He holds 12 patents.

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Gary William Flake
Dr. Flake joined Yahoo! with the acquisition of Overture in 2003 to lead Yahoo!s research and development efforts, focusing on creating the next generation of Web search. Prior to joining Overture, he was a research scientist at NEC Research Institute and the leader of its Web data-mining program. He has numerous publications spanning over 15 years which have focused on machine learning, data mining, and self-organization. His other research interests include Web measurements, efficient algorithms, models of adaptation inspired by nature, and time series forecasting. Dr. Flake has served on numerous academic conference and workshop organization committees and is a member of the editorial board for the Association for Computing Machinery's Transactions on Internet Technologies. Dr. Flake, who earned his Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Maryland, College Park, also wrote the award-winning book, The Computational Beauty of Nature, which is used in college courses worldwide.

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Mark Fletcher
Mark Fletcher is founder and CEO of Bloglines, the world's most popular free internet service for searching, subscribing, publishing, and sharing news feeds and blogs. Fletcher is a serial entrepreneur who began his start-up career as a senior engineer at Diba, an information appliance technology company acquired by Sun Microsystems in 1997. Following Diba, Fletcher founded and was CEO of ONElist/eGroups, an email community service which grew, over 24 months, to 17 million members and 800,000 unique email groups before it was acquired by Yahoo! in 2000. The ONElist/eGroups service continues to successfully operate today as Yahoo! Groups. Fletcher holds a B.S. in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego.

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Jason Fried
Jason Fried is the founder of 37signals, an influential Chicago-based web application design firm. 37signals' BASECAMP (web-based project management), BACKPACK (web-based personal information management), and TA-DA LIST (web-based to-do lists) products are used on a daily basis by tens of thousands of people and small businesses in over 50 countries.

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Apostolos Gerasoulis
Apostolos Gerasoulis, is the founder of Teoma Technologies, a part of Ask Jeeves Co. He is currently an executive vice president for Ask Jeeves. He received a Ph.D. from SUNY at Stony Brook, and has been a Professor of Computer Science at Rutgers University since 1979. Gerasoulis founded Teoma search engine in February 2000 and served as a CEO and CTO until it was sold to Ask Jeeves on September 11, 2001. He led the team that produced the technologies for Teoma, now a major search engine powering Ask Jeeves properties, as well other major portals such as Lycos and Infospace. He is currently leading the technology and product development for Ask Jeeves Labs. A recent interview gives a more in-depth view of search engine technologies by Gerasoulis.

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Neil Gershenfeld
Prof. Neil Gershenfeld is the Director of MIT's Center for Bits and Atoms. His unique laboratory investigates the relationship between the content of information and its physical representation, from molecular quantum computers to virtuosic musical instruments. Technology from his lab has been seen and used in settings including New York's Museum of Modern Art and rural Indian villages, the White House/Smithsonian Millennium celebration and automobile safety systems, Las Vegas shows and Sami reindeer herds.

He is the author of numerous technical publications, patents, and books including When Things Start To Think, The Nature of Mathematical Modeling, and The Physics of Information Technology. He has been featured in media such as The New York Times, The Economist, CNN, and the McNeil/Lehrer News Hour.

Gershenfeld has a B.A. in Physics with High Honors from Swarthmore College, a Ph.D. from Cornell University, was a Junior Fellow of the Harvard University Society of Fellows, and a member of the research staff at Bell Labs.

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Saul Griffith
Saul Griffith is an MIT alumnus with multiple degrees in Materials Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. Griffith completed his Ph.D. at the MIT Media Laboratory in 2004 on self-replicating hardware and the role and limits of information and state in the self-assembly of complex structure. While at MIT, Griffith co-founded Low Cost Eyeglasses, a company using two novel technologies to provide prescription eyecare at low cost for rural and developing communities. Also at MIT Griffith also started Howtoons with Joost Bonsen and Nick Dragotta. Howtoons is an alternative curricular for hands-on science and engineering, illustrated in playful cartoons. A deep interest in the use of social networks for engineering and design led Griffith to co-found Thinkcycle, and Instructables, experimental platforms for enabling open source approaches to developing physical objects. Griffith received the $30,000 Lemelson-MIT award for inventiveness, and was awarded the Collegiate Inventors award by the National Inventors Hall of Fame. He has received numerous other awards in design and engineering. Griffith's principal research focus is in new multifunctional materials and in minimum and constrained energy surfaces for novel manufacturing techniques. If any description were to tie this seemingly broad array of interests together it is that the last 40 years of developments in logic theory and software and documentation enables new ways to look at the way we build and manufacture things. Why, for example, can't physical objects have source code? If we think of the physical elements of a machine as parts of a program, how do we utilize physics and information to define the resulting objects that the machine/s produce? Why not teach children the elements of logic and programming using hands on physical exercises rather than computers? Why not consider the various processes used in making things as shareable sub-routines in a greater library of manufacturing? Griffith holds multiple patents and patents pending in textiles, optics, & nanotechnology.

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Tim Halle
Tim Halle is a technology consultant living and working in Cambridge Mass. Prior to his life as director of the Project for Open Source Media, Tim spent three years at WGBH television as project manager for interactive television. Prior to that Tim worked in dot com land and on the technical side of the entertainment business generating a client list that runs the gamut from corperate clients such as Nike and Motorola to entertainment clients such as U2 and Metallica.

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Ben Hammersley
Ben Hammersley is a writer, journalist, and professional adventurer. He covers technology for the British national press, and has written and Developing Feeds for RSS and Atom for O'Reilly, amongst other things. He lives in Florence, Italy, and is currently training for an expedition to the North Pole.

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Paul Hammond
Paul Hammond works for the Technology and Design team of BBC Radio and Music Interactive, utilising digital radio, interactive television, the Web, and mobile platforms to extend the corporation's ten national music and speech-based radio stations.

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Margaret Hanley
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Matthew Haughey
Weblog pioneer and creator of MetaFilter.com, Matthew Haughey is currently the Creative Director of Creative Commons, a non-profit organization offering an alternative to full copyright.

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Chris Heathcote
Chris Heathcote works in the Insight & Innovation unit of Nokia, analyzing disruptive technology and trends, and creating new user experiences. He writes about buildings and food at anti-mega.com.

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Marc Hedlund
Marc Hedlund is Chief Product Officer at Wesabe, a personal finance startup. (He blogs at "Wheaties for Your Wallet": http://www.wesabe.com/blog/.) Before starting Wesabe, Marc was an entrepreneur-in-residence at O'Reilly Media. Prior to that, he was VP of Engineering at Sana Security; co-founder and CEO of Popular Power, a distributed computing startup; and founder and general manager of Lucas Online, the internet subsidiary of Lucasfilm, Ltd. During his early career, Marc was Director of Engineering at Organic Online, and was CTO at Webstorm, where he wrote one of the Internet's first shopping cart applications in 1994. He is a graduate of Reed College.

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Cal Henderson
Cal Henderson has been a web applications developer for far too long and should really start looking for a serious job. Originally from London, he currently works at Yahoo! Inc as the architect and development lead for Flickr. He formed part of the original Flickr team at Ludicorp in Vancouver, Canada. Before Flickr, he was the technical director of Special Web Projects at Emap, a UK media company. Outside of Flickr, he contributes to several open source projects and writes occasional articles about web application development and security.

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JC Herz
JC Herz is the project leader of CASCADE, a Defense Department initiative to identify emerging technologies, modify as needed, and shepherd them through the Defense Department's Kafka-esque bureaucracy so that they can be used by operators in the field. Focus areas are social software and computer games. Current clients include Special Forces Command, the Undersecretary of Defense (Intelligence), and DARPA.

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W. Daniel Hillis
Danny Hillis is Co-Chairman and Chief Technology Officer of Applied Minds, Inc., a research and development company creating a range of new products and services in software, entertainment, electronics, biotechnology and mechanical design. The company also provides advanced technology, creative design and consulting services to a variety of clients.

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Wiley Hodges

Wiley Hodges is the Senior Product Line Manager for Developer Products at Apple Computer Inc., where he is responsible for marketing for Xcode, Java, WebObjects, AppleScript, and other technologies that affect developers on Mac OS X. His first Mac programming experience was writing HyperCard XCMDs in Pascal in the 1980s, which put him on a path that led eventually to UNIX and object-oriented programming.

Throughout his professional career he has stayed close to development as well as open source technologies, working at technology companies including NeXT Software, Sendmail, Inc., and Apple Computer, Inc.

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Tom Hoffman
Tom Hoffman is manager of SchoolTool, an initiative funded by the Shuttleworth Foundation to create an open source IT framework for schools. Hoffman has worked as a public high school English teacher and technology coordinator in Providence, Rhode Island. He has developed applications for schools using Python, Zope, and RDF.

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Tom Igoe
Tom Igoe teaches courses in physical computing and networking devices. His current research focuses on ecologically sustainable practices in technology development. Along with Dan O'Sullivan, he co-authored the book "Physical Computing: Sensing and Controlling the Physical World with Computers," which has been adopted by numerous digital art and design programs around the world.

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Natalie Jeremijenko
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Matt D. Jones
Matt Jones is a designer. From 1997 to 1999, he was creative director for the award-winning BBC News Online. After some time as a consultant at Sapient and KPMG, he returned to the BBC to design BBCi's web search and an ambitious social software service, iCan. He is now working in concept development for Nokia. The shape of his head is at blackbeltjones

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Kevin Kealy
As a Director at AT&T Labs, Kevin's current duties include research and development of cutting edge technologies such as VoIP, VPNs, Wireless and more.  His focus is mainly on security issues and is heavily involved in the delivery of IT Security consultancy to internal and external customers, the operation of AT&T's Check Point training facility (which he established), and he is a regular public speaker on the subject of Internet Security.  He is also a key member of the team tasked with securing AT&T's enormous IP backbone. Kevin has been with AT&T since 1996, having joined the European arm of the company as a Senior Consultant.  Among Kevin's achievements in Europe were the creation and expansion of an IT Security Consultancy offer and the AT&T Managed Firewall offer. Among the customer projects on which Kevin has worked are the establishment of a secured connection to the Internet for GCHQ (the British equivalent of the NSA), the design and deployment of a secure Internet/Intranet infrastructure for two major banks, countless firewall deployments and many ethical hacking engagements. Kevin holds a Ph. D and a Master's degree in Information Security from the University of London, where he is also an Associate Lecturer on the topic of Internet Security.  He has one book in print, with another on the way.  Kevin is a Check Point and Raptor Certified Instructor, and holds CISSP status.  He is a member in good standing of the IEEE and

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Joe Kraus
Joe Kraus is co-founder and CEO of JotSpot, the first application-wiki company. A long time entrepreneur, Kraus has been involved with early-stage technology development and starting companies for more than twelve years. Upon graduation from Stanford University in 1993, he joined with five engineering friends to found the highly successful internet company, Excite, Inc. The original president of Excite, Kraus was deeply involved in product strategy, direction, and vision as the company grew. He also held senior operational roles in business development, international development, and content.

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Raffi C. Krikorian
Raffi Krikorian makes a career of hacking everything and anything. During his stints as a MIT student he developed a Java-based distributed/mobile software agent infrastructure while also investigating human perception of sound in zero-g with NASA. He finished off by studying and building tiny, embedded, and sub-$5 Internet nodes and by teaching students "How To Make (Almost) Anything".

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Rahul Lahiri
Rahul Lahiri is the Vice President of Search Product Management at Ask Jeeves Inc. Mr. Lahiri joined Ask Jeeves in 2004 and is primarily responsible for overseeing the next generation of the company’s proprietary algorithmic search technology and its implementation into the Ask Jeeves consumer search product (www.ask.com).

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James Larsson
James Larsson is an electronics engineer and IT historian from London for whom hardware hacking is both work and play. In addition to designing electronic equipment, he lectures and broadcasts about computer history. He also regularly performs comedy science shows where advanced scientific principles are used to do ridiculous things.

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Tim Lauer
Tim Lauer serves as the principal of Meriwether Lewis Elementary School in Portland, Oregon. He routinely works with school administrators and teachers to plan practical, supportable uses of technology in teaching and learning. Having been a teacher for many years, he understands the real world of the classroom and the challenges to move forward technologically within tight budgets. In 1994, Lauer developed one of the first sites in the nation for an elementary school, and Buckman Elementary is still a landmark on the web. Besides his work as an elementary school principal, he is also an adjunct professor at Pacific University and Lewis and Clark College. He holds a Bachelor's degree from University of Oregon, a Master's degree from Wheeling Jesuit University.

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Paula Le Dieu
Paula Le Dieu is the director of Creative Commons International. With more than 70 countries currently in the process of establishing local language and jurisdictional versions of Creative Commons licences and Science Commons projects, Le Dieu's role is to ensure that the global creative and innovation domain grows and thrives.

Prior to joining Creative Commons, Le Dieu worked for the BBC in the role of project director for the Creative Archive. This is a public service initiative to provide the fuel for digital creativity by opening up access to, and allowing for, re-use of Britain's cultural heritage starting with the BBC's radio and television archive. Le Dieu remains involved with the BBC Creative Archive project as a special advisor and spokesperson.

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Lawrence Lessig
Lawrence Lessig is a Professor of Law and John A. Wilson Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Stanford Law School. Professor Lessig is chairman of the board of Creative Commons and founder of the school's Center for Internet and Society. He sits on the board of directors for the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and the Public Library of Science. In 2002, Lessig was named one of Scientific American's Top 50 Innovators, and the American Bar Association recently awarded him the Cyberspace Law Excellence Award.

From 1991 to 1997, Lessig was a professor at the University of Chicago Law School. He then became the Berkman Professor of Law at Harvard Law School. In 1999-2000, he was a fellow at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin before moving to Stanford in 2000.

Lessig teaches and writes in the areas of constitutional law, law and high technology, Internet regulation, comparative constitutional law, and the law of cyberspace. His book, Code, and Other Laws of Cyberspace, was published by Basic Books, and The Future of Ideas: The Fate of the Commons in a Connected World, is available from Random House. His most recent book, Free Culture: How Big Media Uses Technology and the Law to Lock Down Culture and Control Creativity, is now available online at www.free-culture.cc and from Penguin Press.

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Mike Linksvayer
Speaker biography coming soon.

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Tom Loosemore
Tom Loosemore is a senior manager at BBC New Media. Some of his recent projects including a 7-day record-everything DVR, the million-strong BBC Programme Catalogue (http://open.bbc.co.uk/catalogue) and BBC Macro, an online testbed containing tens of thousands of BBC TV shows. He is currently leading of a review of the BBC's Web portfolio, in the light of all this 2.0 malarkey.

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Stefan Magdalinski

Stefan Magdalinski has been an online civic activist for over 10 years. Previous projects he founded include http://faxyourmp.com, and the groundbreaking online geocoded information source and community, UpMyStreet

His most recent project, TheyWorkForYou, is an activist-created and run re-implementation of Hansard, the UK's parliamentary record. With no co-operation from the authorities, it adds comments, outbound links, trackbacks, functioning search, and finally Wikipedia and Technorati magic to the previously static document, as well as detailed statistics on the performance of UK Politicians.

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Nelson Minar
Nelson Minar is a software engineer at Google who works on the Google Web APIs and on AdWords. Prior to joining Google in 2001, he was the co-founder of Popular Power, a distributed computing company; a graduate student at the MIT Media Lab; and a research programmer at the Santa Fe Institute. Minar has spoken at several previous O'Reilly conferences and keeps a weblog.

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Annalee Newitz
Annalee Newitz (www.techsploitation.com) is a tech writer and activist. By day, she works as the policy analyst at the Electronic Frontier Foundation. During long lunch breaks and late-night coffee jags, she writes the award-winning, syndicated column Techsploitation. She also writes for Wired, Popular Science, Salon, and Security Focus.

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Peter Norvig, Ph.D.

Peter Norvig is the Director of Search Quality at Google Inc.. He is a Fellow and Councilor of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence and co-author of Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach, the leading textbook in the field.

Previously he was head of the Computational Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center, where he oversaw a staff of 200 scientists performing NASA's research and development in autonomy and robotics, automated software engineering and data analysis, neuro-engineering, collaborative systems research, and simulation-based decision-making. Before that he was Chief Scientist at Junglee, where he helped develop one of the first Internet comparison shopping service; Chief designer at Harlequin Inc; and Senior Scientist at Sun Microsystems Laboratories.

Dr. Norvig received a B.S. in Applied Mathematics from Brown University and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley. He has been a Professor at the University of Southern California and a Research Faculty Member at Berkeley. He has over fifty publications in various areas of Computer Science, concentrating on Artificial Intelligence, Natural Language Processing and Software Engineering including the books Paradigms of AI Programming: Case Studies in Common Lisp, Verbmobil: A Translation System for Face-to-Face Dialog, and Intelligent Help Systems for UNIX.

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Nikolaj Nyholm
Nikolaj Nyholm is co-founder and CEO of mobile social software startup Imity. He is a serial entrepreneur with two successful and one miserable startup on his conscience.

Nyholm is also O'Reilly's European Conference Program Chair, co-chairing conferences EuroOSCON and CustomerMade. He furthermore co-produces the annual Danish technology/culture conference reboot.dk. Born in New Delhi, Nyholm today lives in Copenhagen.

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Tim O'Reilly
Tim O'Reilly is founder and CEO of O'Reilly Media, Inc., thought by many to be the best computer book publisher in the world. In addition to publishing pioneering books like Ed Krol's The Whole Internet User's Guide & Catalog (selected by the New York Public Library as one of the most significant books of the twentieth century), O'Reilly has also been a pioneer in the popularization of the Internet. O'Reilly's Global Network Navigator site (GNN, which was sold to America Online in September 1995) was the first Web portal and the first true commercial site on the World Wide Web.

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Jon Oliver
Dr. Oliver is a machine learning expert with 17 years experience in predictive and statistical technologies. He is responsible for the development and deployment of MailFrontier technology that identifies and filters out email threats, including spam, phishing and viruses. Oliver leads the MailFrontier Research team's efforts in analyzing the latest email threat trends and techniques, and applying this to the MailFrontier development process. Prior to joining MailFrontier, he performed research and development for organizations including NASA, eBay, MSN, FAA, and UC Berkeley. Oliver received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Monash University.

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Surj Patel
Surj Patel is currently a freelance mobile and media technologist specializing in innovation. He most recently worked at the R+D lab for the wireless operator Orange in Boston. Previous to that, Patel was at the MIT MediaLab in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Originating from the United Kingdom, Patel started his career as a pioneer of new media at the BBC in 1993 and then worked as part of the original web team there. In 1999 he helped form a content innovation group in the BBC looking at how all the new media formats could be made to interoperate to make useful viewer experiences. Along the way there have been small ventures and industry pats on the back.

His free time is devoted to his young family, music recording, and hacking fun tools like Amabuddy to explore technologies. Current interests are in mobile services, End User Programming of mobile services (people creating things for themselves), web services, and the evolving broadcast industry within an always connected world.

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Michael Pryor
Michael Pryor is the co-founder of Fog Creek Software. His popular website TechInterview.org is one of the most frequently cited sources of brain teaser interview questions for technical jobs. Michael holds a BS in computer science from Dartmouth.

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Richard F. Rashid, Ph.D.
Currently charged with oversight of Microsoft Research’s worldwide operations, Richard F. Rashid previously served as the director of Microsoft Research, focusing on operating systems, networking and multiprocessors. In that role he was responsible for managing work on key technologies leading to the development of Microsoft Corp’s interactive TV system and authored a number of patents in areas such as data compression, networking and operating systems. In addition to running Microsoft Research, Rashid also was instrumental in creating the team that eventually became Microsoft’s Digital Media Division and directing Microsoft’s first e-commerce group. Rashid was promoted to vice president of Microsoft Research in 1994, and then to senior vice president in 2000.

Before joining Microsoft in September 1991, Rashid was professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). After becoming a CMU faculty member in September 1979, he directed the design and implementation of several influential network operating systems, and published dozens of papers about computer vision, operating systems, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols and communications security. During his tenure at CMU, Rashid developed the Mach multiprocessor operating system, which has been influential in the design of many modern operating systems and remains at the core of a number of commercial systems.

Rashid was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering in 2003 for his work in operating systems and for innovation in industrial research.

He also is credited with co-development of one of the earliest networked computer games, "Alto Trek," during the mid-1970s. An updated version of this game has been developed by Microsoft and has been released under the name "Allegiance."

Rashid is a member of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Computer Directorate Advisory Committee. He is a past member of the DARPA UNIX Steering Committee and the CSNet Executive Committee and a former chairman of the ACM Software System Awards Committee.

Rashid’s research interests have focused on artificial intelligence, operating systems, networking and multiprocessors. He has participated in the design and implementation of the University of Rochester RIG operating system (1975&1979), the Rochester Virtual Terminal Management System (1976&1979), the CMU Distributed Sensor Network Testbed (1980&1983) and CMU’s SPICE distributed personal computing environment, which included the Accent network operating system (1981&1985). He has published papers on computer vision, operating systems, programming languages for distributed processing, network protocols and communication security.

Rashid received a Master of Science (1977) and Doctoral (1980) degrees in computer science from the University of Rochester. He graduated with honors in mathematics and comparative literature from Stanford University in 1974.

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Sam Ruby
Sam Ruby is a senior technical staff member in the Emerging Technologies group at IBM and is involved in a host of open source initiatives. He is a member of the board of directors and vice president of the Apache Software Foundation and a developer on the Apache Soap project. He is also the chairman of the Jakarta project.

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Joshua Schachter
Joshua Schachter started del.icio.us as a hobby in 2003 and ignited the whole tagging phenomenon. He began to work on it full-time with the founding of del.icio.us inc in March, 2005. Before that, Joshua worked in financial services in NYC for ten years, including most recently with Morgan Stanley. Joshua has a BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University.

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Jason Schultz
Jason Schultz is a staff attorney specializing in intellectual property and reverse engineering. He currently leads EFF's Patent Busting Project. Prior to joining EFF, Schultz worked at the law firm of Fish & Richardson P.C., where he spent most of his time invalidating software patents and defending open source developers in law suits. He maintains a personal blog at lawgeek.net.

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Wendy Seltzer
Wendy Seltzer is a staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation. A Fellow with Harvard Law School's Berkman Center for Internet & Society, she founded and leads the Chilling Effects Clearinghouse. ChillingEffects.org collects and analyzes cease-and-desist notices sent to Internet users, and provides information to help these users understand their rights in response. She was also an adjunct professor at St. John's University School of Law this past fall, teaching Internet Law. Wendy is a graduate of Harvard Law School and Harvard College.

Seltzer outlines her point of view on the panel: "I've been a technology geek longer than I've been a lawyer, so it disturbs me when the blunt tool of the law gets in the way of cool new toys. I wanted to explore how copy controls affect media devices and user experiences by talking with people who have been designing, testing, and using the latest media tech.

"We're trying to cut through the hype about DRM. To some people, 'rights management' is the greatest thing since sliced bread; to others it's the devil incarnate. Do the two groups see eye-to-eye at any point? Are they even talking about the same 'DRM'? We'll look at where rights management is being used now, and to what effect. Lots of business models are built around delivery of locked-up audio and video content. Are these models more likely to add value or to alienate customers? Companies strike different balances trying to accomodate both rights managment and consumer demands -- which ones work?

"I hope technologists and content providers will come away from the presentation with ideas about how to serve their customers better, and that end-users will leave with clearer demands for and expectations from new technologies they use. As technology becomes deeply ingrained in our lives, we need to think hard about who controls our technology. Do our computers obey us or our software vendors; will our speakers lock us out at the behest of the record company? Technological innovation will come from those who focus on the needs of their customers first."

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Mike Shaver
Mike Shaver is a co-founder of the Mozilla project, and leads the Mozilla Corporation's work to support the developer ecosystem that has grown up around Firefox and Mozilla technologies. A veteran of open source development, Mike has worked on code at virtually every level of the open source application stack, ranging from the Linux kernel and Lustre clustered filesystem to Mozilla's Gecko layout engine and even, when he was younger and didn't know better, some CORBA infrastructure.

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Clay Shirky
Clay Shirky teaches at NYU's graduate Interactive Telecommunications Program. He writes and consults on the social and economic effects of the Internet, concentrating particularly on the decentralization of applications (peer-to-peer architectures and programmatic interfaces) and on the current explosion in social software.

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Kathy Sierra
Kathy Sierra is the author of Creating Passionate Users, and has been interested in the brain and artificial intelligence since her days as a game developer (Virgin, Amblin', MGM). She is the co-creator of the bestselling brain-friendly Head First series (winner of the Jolt Software Development award in 2004).

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Mark Simpkins
Mark Simpkins is a technical consultant for the Design Against Crime initiative, based at Central St Martins College of Art and Design. He has advised them on the use of social software tools in design-led practice in both the collation of evidence as well as integration into actual design solutions. The first project was Bike Off, a site dealing with bike parking facilities, used to collect anecdotal evidence on the quality of facilities for research into bike theft. Based on principals initially developed for ConsultationProcess.org, the project is pre-populating a weblog framework with information (in this case photographs of bike parking facilities), and inviting the community to comment upon this information. The results from this site will be fed back into students' design projects, as well as future evolutions of the site.

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Erik Smartt
Erik Smartt currently serves as Product Manager, Development Platform Tools. He is directly responsible for Nokia’s recently released “Python for Series 60,” which ports the Open Source, dynamic Python programming language to the Series 60 Platform by Nokia. Since joining Nokia in 2002, he has held several positions, including Product Manager of the Nokia Content Syndication Program and Technology Manager in Forum Nokia. He has been instrumental at Forum Nokia in developing content aggregation and syndication technologies that enable content sharing between Nokia and key technology partners. Prior to joining Nokia, Smartt served as Senior Information Architect and Creative Developer at Viant, before which he was a Creative Strategist with c2o Interactive Architects. He previously spent several years as a freelance multimedia and mobile applications developer. Smartt has spoken on content syndication technologies and adopting open standards at the Nokia Web & Markup Technologies Conference 2003 and the Nokia XML Conference 2002. He has taught Internet Development at university level and holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from the University of Texas at Austin.

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Joel Spolsky
Joel Spolsky, of Joel on Software blog fame, founded Fog Creek Software, a New York City-based software company that develops software tools for programmers. They make FogBugz, a Jolt-Award winning project tracking application, and Fog Creek Copilot, the easiest way to provide remote assistance over the internet.

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Damien Stolarz
Damien Stolarz is an entrepreneur with fifteen years of experience making computers talk to each other. He is the CEO of both Robotarmy Corp., a software/R&D consultancy, and Carbot, Inc. an in-car computer company. He authored "Mastering Internet Video" (Addison-Wesley, 2004). Stolarz holds a B.S. in Computer Science/Engineering from UCLA.

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James Surowiecki
James Surowiecki is a staff writer at the New Yorker, where he writes the bi-weekly business column “The Financial Page.” His work has appeared in a wide range of publications, including, among others, the New York Times Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, and Wired. He’s the author of the recently released book The Wisdom of Crowds, in which he argues that under the right circumstances groups are often smarter than even their smartest members.

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Alan Taylor
Alan Taylor has been a professional Web Developer for the past nine years. In that time he has worked at msnbc.com, drugstore.com, amazon.com, and is currently a Senior Web Developer for monster.com's User Experience group. He is the author of numerous web-based projects and experiments housed at Kokogiak.com, the best known project being "Amazon Light", an early example of what could be done with Amazon.com's Web Service platform.

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Ben Trott
Ben Trott is co-founder and CTO of Six Apart, the leader in blogging software and services. Ben manages technical direction for the Six Apart team all over the world, having developed Movable Type with his co-founder and wife Mena G. Trott in 2001, led development of the TypePad hosted blogging service in 2003, and most recently spearheaded development of Six Apart’s new personal blogging service for friends and family, Vox. He lives in San Francisco with Mena and their dog Maddy.

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Werner Vogels
Dr. Werner Vogels is Vice President & Chief Technology Officer at Amazon.com where he is responsible for driving the company’s technology vision, which is to continuously enhance the innovation on behalf of Amazon’s customers at a global scale. Prior to joining Amazon, he worked as a research scientist at Cornell University where he was a principal investigator in several research projects that target the scalability and robustness of mission-critical enterprise computing systems.

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Jimmy Wales
Jimmy "Jimbo" Donal Wales is an internet entrepreneur and founder of Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wales is currently the president of the Wikimedia Foundation, a Tampa-based non-profit organization that encompasses Wikipedia and its younger sister projects. Wales's latest project is Wikia, which combines wiki social norms with search technology.

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Matt Webb
Matt Webb is a principal of the creative design consultancy Schulze and Webb where his work has included material prototyping for Nokia, Web strategy for the BBC, and exploration into the future uses of RFID. S&W works in near-term product R&D and, as embodied in the USB puppet Availabot, has a special focus on the social life of stuff. Matt speaks on interaction design and technology, is co-author of Mind Hacks, cognitive psychology for a general audience, and builds polite social software and Web toys. He can be found at Interconnected and in London.

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Evan Williams
Evan Williams is founder of Obvious, a web-product development lab in San Francisco and co-founder of Twitter. He's been working on startups and the Internet since 1994, when he founded his first company in his home state of Nebraska. Later, he worked for O'Reilly Media, Intel, and HP as a web application developer before going on to form Pyra Labs and lead the team that created Blogger. In early 2003, Williams sold Pyra to Google, where he led the Blogger group until October 2004. After that, he helped form Odeo, an early podcasting company, which was purchased by Obvious in late 2006.

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